Saturday, August 27, 2016

A Second Basic Vandyke Edge


The pattern for today is a basic Vandyke. I found it in The Lady's Manual of Fancy-Work: a complete instructor in every variety of ornamental needle-work. I talked about making if from the published directions earlier this year on February 27th

It has 12 squares in the border, 7 points along each side of the Vandyke, 1 square at the point, and 1 column of squares between Vandykes.



To find how many final Vandykes are needed, divide the number of squares in the border by 1 less than double the number of points along one side.  If the answer is not a whole number (if it contains a remainder), round the number of Vandykes needed up to the next higher whole number.  For our example: 12 divided by (2 times 7 minus 1), or in other words, 12 divided by 13, is greater than zero and less than 1, so it will be rounded up to 1, which means we will use 1 final Vandyke.

To determine which of the 4 types of instructions to use, double the number of points along one side of the Vandyke, subtract 1, then subtract the number of squares in the border.  For our example: 2 times 7 =14; 14 subtract 1 = 13; 13 subtract 12 = 1.

Last week we explained that when the answer is 1 - Start with two rows of plain netting, then alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it).

You will notice that this final Vandyke starts with 2 plain rows.  This is different from last week's type 0.

The pattern for this Vandyke is:

First Vandyke with straight, vertical side
Tie the thread from the netting needle onto the foundation loop, leaving a 6" tail.
Row 1: Net 2 knots in the foundation loop. (2 loops in the row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in the first loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (3 loops in the row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (10 loops in the row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (11 loops in the row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (12 loops in the row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (13 loops in the row)
Row 13: Net 1 knot in each loop. (13 loops in the row)
Row 14: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (14 loops in the row)
Row 15: Net 1 knot in each loop. (14 loops in the row)
Row 16: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (15 loops in the row)
Row 17: Net 1 knot in each loop. (15 loops in the row)
Row 18: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (16 loops in the row)
Row 19: Net 1 knot in each loop. (16 loops in the row)
Row 20: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (17 loops in the row)
Row 21: Net 1 knot in each loop. (17 loops in the row)
Row 22: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (18 loops in the row)
Row 23: Net 1 knot in each loop. (18 loops in the row)
Row 24: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (19 loops in the row)
Row 25: Net 1 knot in each loop. (19 loops in the row)
Row 26: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (20 loops in the row)
Row 27: Net 1 knot in each loop for 13 loops, leave 7 loops without a knot, turn the netting. (13 loops in the row)

Repeating Vandyke
Repeat Rows 14-27 for each additional Vandyke.

Final Vandyke with Straight, Vertical Side
Rows 28-29: Net 1 knot in each loop. (13 loops in each row)
Row 30: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (12 loops in the row)
Row 31: Net 1 knot in each loop. (12 loops in the row)
Row 32: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (11 loops in the row)
Row 33: Net 1 knot in each loop. (11 loops in the row)
Row 34: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (10 loops in the row)
Row 35: Net 1 knot in each loop. (10 loops in the row)
Row 39: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (9 loops in the row)
Row 37: Net 1 knot in each loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 38: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (8 loops in the row)
Row 39: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 40: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops in the row)

Finishing the first square of the netting
1.      Remove the foundation loop from row 1 of the netting.
2.      Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
3.      Place the foundation-loop cord through another row of meshes.
4.      Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle and attach it to a tension device.
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Designing a Basic Net Vandyke Edge


While making net edges from older books and magazines, I encountered square-mesh net Vandyke Edges. Some needed one final Vandyke, some needed two final Vandykes, one was a basic Vandyke with one square at the bottom and one column of squares between Vandykes, one had more points on the outer edges than on the inner edges, one had a curved scallop at the bottom, and one had two squares at the bottom and two columns of squares between Vandykes. The other two I made were basic Vandykes with one square at the bottom and one column of squares between Vandykes, but they needed two final Vandykes to finish the last vertical edge.

It was these last two (see one and two) that really frustrated me.  They looked the same - one square at the bottom of the Vandyke and one square between Vandykes and they both needed two Vandykes to finish the last vertical edge - but I was unable to use the same instructions to finish them.  I wanted to know why I could not.

After working many hours with my mathematically-gifted husband (who knows only a little about netting), we discovered that there were 4 types of instructions that might be used to finish the basic Vandykes. Which type needed to be used depended on which row the corner was turned.  If we took 2 times the number of points along one side, subtracted 1, and then subtracted the number of squares in the border, we got one of four answers, one for each type:

  1. 0 - Start decreasing immediately, alternating decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it).
  2. 1 - Start with two rows of plain netting, then alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it).
  3. an even number - Alternate increase and plain rows (which combined equal the even number), then alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it).
  4. an odd number greater than 1 - Alternate increase and plain rows (which combined equal one less than the odd number), then net two plain rows, and finally alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it).
Of course, once we finished working out the formulas for the basic Vandykes that used only one final Vandyke, we discovered that the four formulas needed tweaking for each of the other styles of Vandykes.

For the next several weeks I will be writing about different types of endings in each of at least 6 styles of Vandykes.

The pattern for today is a basic Vandyke. It has 5 squares in the border, 3 points along each side of the Vandyke, 1 square at the point, and 1 column of squares between Vandykes.



To find how many final Vandykes are needed, divide the number of squares in the border by 1 less than double the number of points along one side.  If the answer is not a whole number (if it contains a remainder), round the number of Vandykes needed up to the next higher whole number. For our example: 5 divided by (2 times 3 minus 1), or in other words, 5 divided by 5, equals 1 with no remainder, so we will use 1 final Vandyke.

To determine which of the 4 types of instructions to use, double the number of points along one side of the Vandyke, subtract 1, then subtract the number of squares in the border.  For our example: 2 times 3 =6; 6 subtract 1 = 5; 5 subtract 5 = 0.

The pattern for this Vandyke is:

First Vandyke with straight, vertical side
Tie the thread from the netting needle onto the foundation loop, leaving a 6" tail.
Row 1: Net 2 knots in the foundation loop. (2 loops in row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in the first loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (3 loops in row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops in row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop for 6 loops; turn and net back across those loops.

Repeating Vandyke
Repeat from Row 7 to Row 12 until the netting is as long as desired.

Last Vandyke with a straight vertical side
Row 1: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (5 loops in row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in each loop. (5 loops in row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (4 loops in row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop. (4 loops in row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (3 loops in row)

Finishing the first square of the netting
1.      Remove the foundation loop from row 1 of the netting.
2.      Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
3.      Place the foundation-loop cord through another row of meshes.
4.      Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle and attach it to a tension device.
5.      Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.






Saturday, August 13, 2016

Handkerchief with net edge - 4


I've been showing the handkerchiefs I made with a net edge for my granddaughters. This will be the last one for a while, since my remaining granddaughters are too young to choose which net edge they want.

Here is the fourth handkerchief I made for a granddaughter.





This is a close-up of the edge she wanted.





Saturday, August 6, 2016

Handkerchief with net edge - 3


I've been showing the handkerchiefs I made with a net edge for my granddaughters.

Here is the third handkerchief I made for a granddaughter.





This is a close-up of the edge she wanted.





The edge on this handkerchief is very full. This makes it hard to show the edge in a photograph because it has more of a rippled, 3-dimensional effect.


Saturday, July 30, 2016

Mistborn Quilt



In the spring of 1990 I began a tradition of making something for my child who was graduating from high school. They got to choose what it was, although I could veto it if it was too elaborate. That spring my oldest chose a hand-knit sweater using wool I spun on my wheel. After that the children all chose a quilt. Each quilt was different. Due to life getting in the way of my projects, I have never had the project done by the day they graduated. Some were only a few months late, others were several years late.

My youngest child is a big fan of all books by Brandon Sanderson. So I was not surprised when he said he wanted the quilt to be based on the Mistborn series.

When my son said he wanted his quilt to contain the symbols for Allomancy and Feruchemy, I made the mistake of asking (a bit tongue in cheek), "So you want Allomancy on one side and Feruchemy on the other?" Of course he said yes! This quilt is two sided - one design on one side and the other design on the back side.

Last month (2 days before leaving on vacation) I finished his quilt; it was only 4 years + 4 weeks late. I finally got photos taken this week.








Saturday, July 23, 2016

Handkerchief with net edge - 2


Last week I showed the first handkerchief I made with a net edge for my granddaughters.

Here is the second handkerchief I made for a granddaughter.




This is a close-up of the edge she wanted.




Saturday, July 16, 2016

Handkerchief with net edge - 1


About 3 years ago my oldest daughter asked me if I would be willing to net an edge around a handkerchief for each of her daughters.  Of course I said yes. It took some time to find the linen I wanted to use and to learn to hemstitch the edges (isn't the Internet a wonderful tool). Then I took the list of net edges I had found in old books and magazines I had located online and began to make them - one each week. I may find more net edges or borders in the future, but for now I have finished the ones I know about. I thought I should show the handkerchiefs with net edgings I have made so far. (I have 4 granddaughters old enough to chose the edge she wanted.)



Here is the first handkerchief I finished.



This is a close-up of the edge she wanted.