Saturday, September 24, 2016

2016 Eastern States Exposition (The Big E) week 1


This week I spent four days demonstrating netting at The Big E. It was fun to meet with people. Most of them had never seen netting before.


Three of those days were with my daughter. Each day we were in a slightly different location. These photos are from Thursday and Saturday.



Thursday we had a small table out next to an enclosed display case.




Saturday I was in the "corral" with a large table working on the second handkerchief.



During the week I worked on a doily, two handkerchiefs (I finished one), and a shawl. My daughter finished two scarves.

Saturday, September 17, 2016

A Basic Vandyke Edge with Two Final Vandykes


It did not take me long in my exploration of net Vandyke Edges to discover that some Vandyke Edges need more than one Vandyke to turn the corner and create a vertical edge on the last Vandyke.  With my husband's mathematical help, we discovered that there were still four types of turns; however, the directions changed slightly from when there was only one final Vandyke.

Today's sample has 11 squares in the border and 3 points on each side of the Vandykes and needs 2 Vandykes to create the last vertical edge.




The directions are as follows:

First Vandyke with straight, vertical side
1 Net 2 knots in the foundation loop. (2 loops in the row)
2 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (3 loops in the row)
3 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
4 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row)
5 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in the row)
6 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
7 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
8 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
9 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (10 loops in the row)
10 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (11 loops in the row)
11 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (12 loops in the row)
12 Net 1 knot in each loop. (12 loops in the row)
13 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (13 loops in the row)
14 Net 1 knot in each loop. (13 loops in the row)
15 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (14 loops in the row)
16 Net 1 knot in each loop. (14 loops in the row)
17 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (15 loops in the row)
18 Net 1 knot in each loop for 12 loops; turn and net back across those loops.

Repeating Vandyke
13-18     Repeat instructions to create new Vandyke.

Final Vandykes
1 Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net those 2 loops together. (11 loops in the row)
2 Net 1 knot in each loop. (11 loops in the row)
3 Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net those 2 loops together. (10 loops in the row)
4 Net 1 knot in each loop. (10 loops in the row)
5 Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net those 2 loops together. (9 loops in the row)
6 Net 1 knot in each loop for 6 loops, turn the netting and begin the next row. (6 loops in the row)
7 Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net those 2 loops together. (5 loops in the row)
8 Net 1 knot in each loop. (5 loops in the row)
9 Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net those 2 loops together. (4 loops in the row)
10 Net 1 knot in each loop. (4 loops in the row)
11 Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net those 2 loops together. (3 loops in the row)


If you would like to know the math involved, here it is.

To find how many final Vandykes are needed:

  1. If the number of squares in the border is less than or equal to 2 times the number of points -1 then you have just 1 final Vandyke.
  2. If the number of squares in the border is greater than 2 times the number of points -1 then you need more than 1 final Vandyke.
Example: number of squares in the border 11 and number of points is 3 then 2 times 3 subtract 1 = 5
Since 11 is greater than 5 we will need more than 1 Vandyke.

To determine how many more Vandykes are needed:
  1. Subtract 2 times the number of points - 1 from the number of squares in the border (for this example 2 times 3 subtract 1 = 5)  
  2. Subtract that number from 11 (for this example: 11-5 = 6)
  3. Divide the result by 2 times the number of points. If there is a remainder, round up to the next whole number. (for this example: 6 divided by 2 times 3 = 6 divided by 6 which equals 1)

To know how many Vandykes are needed, add 1 to the answer in part 3.  In this case we add 1 to 1 and discover we will need 2 final Vandykes.


To determine which of the 4 types of instructions to use for the final Vandykes:

  1. Take the answer from #3 above (for this example that answer is 1)
  2. Double the number of points along one side of the Vandyke (for this example the answer is 6)
  3. Add the answer from #1 above (for this example that answer is 5 so 6+5=11)
  4. Subtract the number of squares in the border from the result (for this example 11-11 = 0)
When the type of instructions to use for the final Vandykes is 0, the rows are as follows: 
(N= the number of points which in this example is 3)

  • (N - 1) pair(s) of Decrease & Plain rows,
  • then 1 Decrease row,
  • the next Plain row leaves the last N loops without a knot, 
  • turn netting and net (N - 1) pair(s) of Decrease & Plain rows, 
  • followed by 1 Decrease row.

Saturday, September 10, 2016

The Fourth Basic Vandyke Edge


For the final Basic Vandyke I'm going to include 2 different patterns. They have a different number of squares in the border and a different number of points on the sides of the Vandykes.  The first pattern has 5 squares in the border and 5 points on the sides. The second pattern has 3 squares in the border and 6 points along the Vandykes. The reason they are both included in this post is that they both have 1 final Vandyke and they also have the same type of instructions used in creating that final Vandyke.


The patterns for these Vandykes are:

Our first example (5 squares and 5 points):


First Vandyke with straight, vertical side
Tie the thread from the netting needle onto the foundation loop, leaving a 6" tail.
Row 1: Net 2 knots in the foundation loop. (2 loops in the row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in the first loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (3 loops in the row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (10 loops in the row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (11 loops in the row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (12 loops in the row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (13 loops in the row)
Row 13: Net 1 knot in each loop. (13 loops in the row)
Row 14: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (14 loops in the row)
Row 15: Net 1 knot in each loop. (14 loops in the row)
Row 16: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (15 loops in the row)
Row 17: Net 1 knot in each loop. (15 loops in the row)
Row 18: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (16 loops in the row)
Row 19: Net 1 knot in each loop. (16 loops in the row)
Row 20: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (17 loops in the row)
Row 21: Net 1 knot in each loop. (17 loops in the row)
Row 22: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (18 loops in the row)
Row 23: Net 1 knot in each loop. (18 loops in the row)
Row 24: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (19 loops in the row)
Row 25: Net 1 knot in each loop. (19 loops in the row)
Row 26: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (20 loops in the row)
Row 27: Net 1 knot in each loop for 13 loops, leave 7 loops without a knot, turn the netting. (13 loops in the row)

Repeating Vandyke
Rows 14-27: Repeat instructions to create a new Vandyke.


Last Vandyke with a straight vertical side
Rows 1: Net 1 knot in each loop. (13 loops in each row)
Rows 2: Net 1 knot in each loop. (13 loops in each row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (12 loops in the row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop. (12 loops in the row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (11 loops in the row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop. (11 loops in the row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (10 loops in the row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop. (10 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (9 loops in the row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (8 loops in the row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 13: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops in the row)

Forming the first square of the netting
1.      Remove the foundation loop from row 1 of the netting.
2.      Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
3.      Place the foundation-loop cord through another row of meshes.
4.      Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle and attach it to a tension device.
5.      Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.



Our second example (3 squares and 6 points):



First Vandyke with straight, vertical side
Tie the thread from the netting needle onto the foundation loop, leaving a 6" tail.
Row 1: Net 2 more knots in the foundation loop. (2 loops in the row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in the first loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (3 loops in the row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop. (4 loops in the row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 13: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 14: Net 1 knot in each loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 15: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (10 loops in the row)
Row 16: Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops, turn and prepare to begin the next row without netting into the last 6 loops. (These 6 loops form one side of the Vandyke.)

Repeating Vandyke
Rows 5-16: Repeat instructions to create a new Vandyke.

Last Vandyke with a straight vertical side
Row 1: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in each loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop.  (7 loops in the row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop for 6 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops in the row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop for 5 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (6 loops in the row)

Forming the first square of the netting
1.      Remove the foundation loop from row 1 of the netting.
2.      Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
3.      Place the foundation-loop cord through another row of meshes.
4.      Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle and attach it to a tension device.
5.      Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.



If you would like to know the math involved, here it is.

To find how many final Vandykes are needed:
  • If the number of squares in the border is less than or equal to 2 times the number of points -1 then you have just 1 final Vandyke.
  • If the number of squares in the border is greater than 2 times the number of points -1 then you need more than 1 final Vandyke.
 First Example: 
  • number of squares in the border 5 
  • number of points is 5 then 2 times 5 subtract 1 = 9
  • since the number of squares in the border is less than the other number we will need 1 Vandyke. 
 Second Example: 
  • number of squares in the border 3 
  • number of points is 6 then 2 times 6 subtract 1 = 11
  • since the number of squares in the border is less than the other number we will need 1 Vandyke. 

To determine which of the 4 types of instructions to use for the final Vandyke:
  1. Double the number of points along one side of the Vandyke 
    1. for the first example the answer is 10
    2. for the second example the answer is 12
  2. Subtract 1 
    1. for the first example the answer is 9
    2. for the second example the answer is 11
  3. Subtract the number of squares in the border from the result 
    1. for the first example the answer is 9 - 5 = 4
    2. for the second example the answer is 11 - 3 = 8
When the answer is an even number (in this week's example, the numbers are 4 and 8) - Alternate increase and plain rows (which combined equal the even number), then alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it). You can tell it is the last decrease row because it has the correct number of loops on the last side of the final Vandyke.


Saturday, September 3, 2016

A Third Basic Vandyke Edge


The pattern for today is another basic Vandyke. It has 4 squares in the border, 4 points along each side of the Vandyke, 1 square at the point, and 1 column of squares between Vandykes.




The pattern for this Vandyke is:


First Vandyke with straight, vertical side

Tie the thread from the netting needle onto the foundation loop, leaving a 6" tail.



Row 1: Net 2 more knots in the foundation loop. (2 loops in the row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in the first loop and 2 knots in the last loop. (3 loops in the row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop for 3 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop for 5 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop for 6 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop for 7 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 13: Net 1 knot in each loop for 5 loops, turn the netting and prepare to start the next row, leaving the other 4 loops to form one side of the Vandyke.

Repeating Vandyke
Rows 6-13: Repeat instructions to create a new Vandyke.

Last Vandyke with a straight vertical side
Row 1: Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (5 loops in the row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop for 3 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (4 loops in the row)

Forming the first square of the netting.
1. Remove the foundation loop from row 1 of the netting.
2. Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
3. Place the foundation-loop cord through another row of meshes.
4. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle and attach it to a tension device.
5. Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.




If you would like to know the math involved, here it is.


To find how many final Vandykes are needed:
  • If the number of squares in the border is less than or equal to 2 times the number of points -1 then you have just 1 final Vandyke.
  • If the number of squares in the border is greater than 2 times the number of points -1 then you need more than 1 final Vandyke.
          Example: 
  • number of squares in the border 4 
  • number of points is 4 then 2 times 4 subtract 1 = 7
  • since the number of squares in the border is less than the other number we will need 1 Vandyke.

To determine which of the 4 types of instructions to use for the final Vandyke:
  1. Double the number of points along one side of the Vandyke (for this example the answer is 8)
  2. Subtract 1 (for our example the answer is 7)
  3. Subtract the number of squares in the border from the result (for this example 7-4 = 3)


When the answer is an odd number greater than 1 (in this week's example, the number is 3)- Alternate increase and plain rows (which combined equal one less than the odd number), then net two plain rows, and finally alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it). You can tell it is the last decrease row because it has the correct number of loops on the last side of the final Vandyke.


Saturday, August 27, 2016

A Second Basic Vandyke Edge


The pattern for today is a basic Vandyke. I found it in The Lady's Manual of Fancy-Work: a complete instructor in every variety of ornamental needle-work. I talked about making if from the published directions earlier this year on February 27th

It has 12 squares in the border, 7 points along each side of the Vandyke, 1 square at the point, and 1 column of squares between Vandykes.





The pattern for this Vandyke is:

First Vandyke with straight, vertical side

Tie the thread from the netting needle onto the foundation loop, leaving a 6" tail.

Row 1: Net 2 knots in the foundation loop. (2 loops in the row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in the first loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (3 loops in the row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (10 loops in the row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (11 loops in the row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (12 loops in the row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (13 loops in the row)
Row 13: Net 1 knot in each loop. (13 loops in the row)
Row 14: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (14 loops in the row)
Row 15: Net 1 knot in each loop. (14 loops in the row)
Row 16: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (15 loops in the row)
Row 17: Net 1 knot in each loop. (15 loops in the row)
Row 18: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (16 loops in the row)
Row 19: Net 1 knot in each loop. (16 loops in the row)
Row 20: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (17 loops in the row)
Row 21: Net 1 knot in each loop. (17 loops in the row)
Row 22: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (18 loops in the row)
Row 23: Net 1 knot in each loop. (18 loops in the row)
Row 24: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (19 loops in the row)
Row 25: Net 1 knot in each loop. (19 loops in the row)
Row 26: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (20 loops in the row)
Row 27: Net 1 knot in each loop for 13 loops, leave 7 loops without a knot, turn the netting. (13 loops in the row)

Repeating Vandyke
Repeat Rows 14-27 for each additional Vandyke.

Final Vandyke with Straight, Vertical Side
Rows 28-29: Net 1 knot in each loop. (13 loops in each row)
Row 30: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (12 loops in the row)
Row 31: Net 1 knot in each loop. (12 loops in the row)
Row 32: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (11 loops in the row)
Row 33: Net 1 knot in each loop. (11 loops in the row)
Row 34: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (10 loops in the row)
Row 35: Net 1 knot in each loop. (10 loops in the row)
Row 39: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (9 loops in the row)
Row 37: Net 1 knot in each loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 38: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (8 loops in the row)
Row 39: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 40: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops in the row)

Finishing the first square of the netting
  1. Remove the foundation loop from row 1 of the netting.
  2. Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
  3. Place the foundation-loop cord through another row of meshes.
  4. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle and attach it to a tension device.
  5. Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.


If you would like to know the math involved, here it is.

To find how many final Vandykes are needed:
  • If the number of squares in the border is less than or equal to 2 times the number of points -1 then you have just 1 final Vandyke.
  • If the number of squares in the border is greater than 2 times the number of points -1 then you need more than 1 final Vandyke.
          Example: 
  • number of squares in the border 12 
  • number of points is 7 then 2 times 7 subtract 1 = 13
  • since the number of squares in the border is less than the other number we will need 1 Vandyke.
To determine which of the 4 types of instructions to use for the final Vandyke:
  1. Double the number of points along one side of the Vandyke (for this example the answer is 14)
  2. Subtract 1 (for our example the answer is 13)
  3. Subtract the number of squares in the border from the result (for this example 13-12 = 1)

Last week we explained that when the answer is 1 - Start with two rows of plain netting, then alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it). You can tell it is the last decrease row because it has the correct number of loops on the last side of the final Vandyke.

You will notice that this final Vandyke starts with 2 plain rows. This is different from last week's type 0.

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Designing a Basic Net Vandyke Edge


While making net edges from older books and magazines, I encountered square-mesh net Vandyke Edges. Some needed one final Vandyke, some needed two final Vandykes, one was a basic Vandyke with one square at the bottom and one column of squares between Vandykes, one had more points on the outer edges than on the inner edges, one had a curved scallop at the bottom, and one had two squares at the bottom and two columns of squares between Vandykes. The other two I made were basic Vandykes with one square at the bottom and one column of squares between Vandykes, but they needed two final Vandykes to finish the last vertical edge.

It was these last two (see one and two) that really frustrated me. They looked the same - one square at the bottom of the Vandyke and one square between Vandykes and they both needed two Vandykes to finish the last vertical edge - but I was unable to use the same instructions to finish them. I wanted to know why I could not.

After working many hours with my mathematically-gifted husband (who knows only a little about netting), we discovered that there were 4 types of instructions that might be used to finish the final basic Vandykes. Which type needed to be used depended on which row the corner was turned. If we took 2 times the number of points along one side, subtracted 1, and then subtracted the number of squares in the border, we got one of four answers, one for each type:

  • 0 - Start decreasing immediately, alternating decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it). You can tell it is the last decrease row because it has the correct number of loops on the last side of the final Vandyke. 
  • 1 - Start with two rows of plain netting, then alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it). You can tell it is the last decrease row because it has the correct number of loops on the last side of the final Vandyke. 
  • an odd number greater than 1 - Alternate increase and plain rows (which combined equal one less than the odd number), then net two plain rows, and finally alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it). You can tell it is the last decrease row because it has the correct number of loops on the last side of the final Vandyke. 
  • an even number - Alternate increase and plain rows (which combined equal the even number), then alternate decrease and plain rows (until the last decrease row, which has no plain row following it). You can tell it is the last decrease row because it has the correct number of loops on the last side of the final Vandyke. 

Of course, once we finished working out the formulas for the basic Vandykes that used only one final Vandyke, we discovered that the four formulas needed tweaking for each of the other styles of Vandykes.

For the next several weeks I will be writing about different types of endings in each of at least 6 styles of Vandykes.


The pattern for today is a basic Vandyke. It has 5 squares in the border, 3 points along each side of the Vandyke, 1 square at the point, and 1 column of squares between Vandykes.



The pattern for this Vandyke is:

First Vandyke with straight, vertical side

Tie the thread from the netting needle onto the foundation loop, leaving a 6" tail.

Row 1: Net 2 knots in the foundation loop. (2 loops in row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in the first loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (3 loops in row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops in row)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in row)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in row)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in row)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops in row)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop for 6 loops; turn and net back across those loops.

Repeating Vandyke
Repeat from Row 7 to Row 12 until the netting is as long as desired.

Last Vandyke with a straight vertical side

Row 1: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (5 loops in row)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in each loop. (5 loops in row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (4 loops in row)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop. (4 loops in row)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (3 loops in row)


Finishing the first square of the netting
  1. Remove the foundation loop from row 1 of the netting.
  2. Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
  3. Place the foundation-loop cord through another row of meshes.
  4. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle and attach it to a tension device.
  5. Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.


If you would like to know the math involved, here it is.


To find how many final Vandykes are needed:
  1. If the number of squares in the border is less than or equal to 2 times the number of points -1 then you have just 1 final Vandyke. 
  2. If the number of squares in the border is greater than 2 times the number of points -1 then you need more than 1 final Vandyke. 
Example:
  1. number of squares in the border 5 
  2. number of points is 3 then 2 times 3 subtract 1 = 5 
  3. since the number of squares in the border is equal to the other number we will need 1 Vandyke. 


To determine which of the 4 types of instructions to use for the final Vandyke:
  1. Double the number of points along one side of the Vandyke (for this example the answer is 6) 
  2. Subtract 1 (for our example the answer is 5) 
  3. Subtract the number of squares in the border from the result (for this example 5-5 = 0) 







Saturday, August 13, 2016

Handkerchief with net edge - 4


I've been showing the handkerchiefs I made with a net edge for my granddaughters. This will be the last one for a while, since my remaining granddaughters are too young to choose which net edge they want.

Here is the fourth handkerchief I made for a granddaughter.





This is a close-up of the edge she wanted.