Saturday, August 29, 2015

Second of Trimmings from The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable


On page 127 of  The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable there are instructions given for two net Trimmings, items 20 and 22. An illustration of that pattern is given on page 125.

Last week I showed number 20, here is number 22, also without the "row of darning-stitch . . . worked in scallops at each edge of the star patterns" (rows 9 and 11).  "No. 22 shows a variation of the same pattern, working more rows over the small mesh, and omitting the edge row described for No. 20."



Below are the instructions, with my wording rather than as it was stated in the book. I used size 20 crochet thread.

Row 1:  #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 11 loops into the foundation loop. (any odd number more than 3 will work)

Rows 2-8: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Star Netting (rows 9-11)
Row 9: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Wrap the thread around the mesh stick one time before netting in the first loop, *net 1 knot in the next loop, wrap the thread around the mesh stick one time before netting in the next loop*; repeat from * to *.  This will create a long loop followed by a short loop and ending with a long loop.

Row 10: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in the first loop (a long loop), *net 1 long loop in a short loop, net 1 knot in the next loop*; repeat from * to *.  The knot into the long loops should rest on the top of the mesh stick.  The knot into a short loop will be higher than the mesh stick, creating a loop that is longer than a short loop but shorter than a long loop. This row will be even along the bottom of the row, no long and short loops.

Row 11: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Draw the first loop up through the long loop on the left (the long loop was created in row 6), net into the first loop, *draw the next loop up through the next long loop (created in row 6), net in the loop drawn up, draw the next loop up through the same long loop just used (it may have been drawn up when the other loop was pulled through the loop created in row 6), net into the loop just drawn up;* repeat from * to *.

Rows 12-13: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 14: #6 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Skip the first loop, *net 1 knot in the following loop, skip the next loop;* repeat from * to * ending with net the last 2 loops together.




Saturday, August 22, 2015

Trimmings from The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable


Today I started looking at net edges in a different book:  The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable.  This book has sections that cover different types of handcrafts.  It was edited by E. Harrison, published in 1884, and revised in 1885.  The section for netting begins on page 121 and is called Fancy Netting.  In this section the items are numbered from 1 to 51.  Some of the items are instructions for stitches or edges, other items are directions for netting techniques, while some are patterns for articles of clothing.

On page 127 there are instructions given for two net Trimmings, items 20 and 22. An illustration of that pattern is given on page 125.

Here is Trimming number 20, without the "row of darning-stitch . . . worked in scallops at each edge of the star patterns" (rows 6 and 8).



Below are the instructions, with my wording rather than as it was stated in the book.

Row 1:  #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 11 loops into the foundation loop. (any odd number more than 3 will work)

Rows 2-5: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Star Netting (rows 6-8)
Row 6: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Wrap the thread around the mesh stick one time before netting in the first loop, *net 1 knot in the next loop, wrap the thread around the mesh stick one time before netting in the next loop*; repeat from * to *.  This will create a long loop followed by a short loop and ending with a long loop.

Row 7: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in the first loop (a long loop), *net 1 long loop in a short loop, net 1 knot in the next loop*; repeat from * to *.  The knot into the long loops should rest on the top of the mesh stick.  The knot into a short loop will be higher than the mesh stick, creating a loop that is longer than a short loop but shorter than a long loop. This row will be even along the bottom of the row, no long and short loops.

Row 8: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Draw the first loop up through the long loop on the left (the long loop was created in row 6), net into the first loop, *draw the next loop up through the next long loop (created in row 6), net in the loop drawn up, draw the next loop up through the same long loop just used (it may have been drawn up when the other loop was pulled through the loop created in row 6), net into the loop just drawn up;* repeat from * to *.

Rows 9-10: #2 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 11: #6 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Skip the first loop, *net 1 knot in the following loop, skip the next loop;* repeat from * to * ending with net the last 2 loops together.

Row 12: #6 knitting needle for a mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.



Saturday, August 15, 2015

Edge of Netted Collar from Tatting and Netting


The edge of the Netted Collar is found on pages 148-149 of Tatting and Netting or page 150 in this version of the book.

What I'm calling the edge began on row 24 and continued through row 29.  Because I made a sample and not the collar I'll number the rows of the sample with the collar rows in parentheses.

Fill one netting needle with single thread and one with double thread.  Begin using the one with single thread.

Row 1: Net 12 loops into the foundation loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Rows 2-3 (24-25): Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 4 (26): Net 1 knot in each loop over a 3/8" mesh stick.

Row 5: (27): Draw the 1st loop through the 2nd and net into the first loop, then draw the 2nd loop through the 1st loop and net through that loop.  Repeat this pattern across the row over a 3/8" mesh stick.

     Cut the single thread and attach the end to the netting needle with double thread.

Row 6: (28): Using double thread and over a 3/8" mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, *net 6 loops in the next loop, net 1 knot in each loop for 3 loops*; repeat from * to * ending with net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops.

     Cut the double thread and attach the end to the netting needle with single thread.

Row 7: (29): Using single thread and over a 1/8" mesh stick, net together 2 double loops (it looks like 4 single loops), *net 1 knot in each single loop of the next 6 double loops for 12 loops, net together 3 double loops (it looks like 6 single loops)*; repeat from * to * ending with net the last 2 double loops together.




Saturday, August 8, 2015

Border of a Square for Neck-handkerchief, Fichus, etc. from Tatting and Netting


The square of netting found on pages 147-148 of Tatting and Netting caught my attention when I was looking through the book. The edge, though, is hard to see exactly what is happening.  However, I am currently netting edges, so that's what I made.

Figuring out how to get the edge to come out correctly when in rows instead of circular presented a bit of a challenge.  Here are the instructions I eventually figured out.

Row 1: Net an odd number of loops in the foundation loop over a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" flat mesh stick. The sample used 9.

Rows 2-3: Net 1 knot in each loop over a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 4: Net 7 knots in the first loop over a 3/8" mesh stick, skip a loop, *net 8 knots in the following loop, skip a loop;* repeat from * to * ending with net 6 knots in the last loop.

Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop over a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick.

Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops over a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick, skip 1 loop, *net 1 knot in each loop for 3 loops, skip 1 loop*; repeat from * to * ending with net 1 knot in each loop for the last 2 loops.

Row 7: Net 1 knot in the first loop, *skip 1 loop, net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops*; repeat from * to *.

Here is the finished sample.




Saturday, August 1, 2015

Netted Lappet for Caps, etc. from Tatting and Netting



I decided to use the instructions for the Netted Lappet for an edge. It is found on pages 146-147 of Tatting and Netting or page 149 of this version of the book. The written instructions did not match the drawing, so I decided to make both versions. Here is how I interpreted the instructions. I adapted the pattern for rows instead of curved around the bottom of the tab.

Row 1: Net an even number of loops (not a multiple of 4) in the foundation loop over a #3 knitting needle or a 1/8" mesh stick.  The sample has 10 loops.

Rows 2-3: Net 1 knot in each loop over the same mesh stick used in row 1.

Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" mesh stick.

Row 5: Net 2 loops together across the row over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Rows 6-7: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" mesh stick

Row 8: Net 6 knots in the first loop, *net 1 knot in the next loop, net 6 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to * over a 1/4" mesh stick.

Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop over a #1 knitting needle.









This is how the netting looked following the instructions.










Here are my instructions for the way the photo looked (without the net embroidery).

Row 1: Net an even number of loops (not a multiple of 4) in the foundation loop over a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick.  The sample has 10 loops.

Rows 2-3: Net 1 knot in each loop over the same mesh stick used in row 1.

Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" mesh stick.

Row 5: Net 2 loops together across the row over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" mesh stick

Row 7: Net 6 knots in the first loop, *net 1 knot in the next loop, net 6 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to * over a 1/4" mesh stick.

Row 8-9: Net 1 knot in each loop over a #1 knitting needle.






This is how the netting looked following the photo.




Saturday, July 25, 2015

Netted Tab (as an edge) from Tatting and Netting



I liked the way the Netted Tab looked on page 146 of Tatting and Netting or page 149 of this version of the book.  I decided to see if I could use the instructions to create an edge. The problem arose when I tried to match the instructions with the photo.  They were not the same. I decided to make both versions.  Here is how I interpreted the instructions. I adapted the pattern for rows instead of curved around the bottom of the tab.

Make a net chain of 24 knots (12 loops) over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.  Place the loops on one side of the chain on a foundation loop.

Row 1: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 2: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 5/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 5: Net 2 loops together across the row over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 7: Net bunches of loops (as described on page 85 of Tatting and Netting) in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Form the long loops in row 2 into Sheaves using the instructions on page 112 of Tatting and Netting.







This is how the netting looked following the instructions.

















Here are my instructions for the way the photo looked (without the net embroidery).

Row 1: Net 12 loops into the foundation loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.  

Rows 2-4: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 5/8" flat mesh stick.

Rows 6-8: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 10: Net 2 loops together across the row over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 11: Net bunches of loops (as described on page 85 of Tatting and Netting) in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Form the long loops in row 5 into Sheaves using the instructions on page 112 of Tatting and Netting.










This is how the netting looked following the photo.













Do you like one edge better than the other?  I think I like the second one better.



Saturday, July 18, 2015

Netted Nightcap Border from Tatting and Netting


The Netted Nightcap found on page 146 of this version of Tatting and Netting looks like a fun piece of netting to try.  However, since I am currently focusing on edges and borders, I decided to just make the border.





I used a 1/8" and 1/4" mesh sticks.  I began the sample with an odd number of loops and net 3 rows of plain netting on the 1/8" mesh stick.

Row 4:  Using the larger mesh, net 3 knots in each loop.

Row 5-6: Using the smaller mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 7: Using the smaller mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, *skip a loop, net 1 knot in the next loop*; repeat from * to *.


I made a variation of this edge by changing row 4 as follows: net 3 knots in the first loop, *skip a loop, net 3 knots in the next loop*; repeat from * to *.  All the other rows were the same.

This is how the variation looked.