Saturday, August 1, 2015

Netted Lappet for Caps, etc. from Tatting and Netting



I decided to use the instructions for the Netted Lappet for an edge. It is found on pages 146-147 of Tatting and Netting or page 149 of this version of the book. The written instructions did not match the drawing, so I decided to make both versions. Here is how I interpreted the instructions. I adapted the pattern for rows instead of curved around the bottom of the tab.

Row 1: Net an even number of loops (not a multiple of 4) in the foundation loop over a #3 knitting needle or a 1/8" mesh stick.  The sample has 10 loops.

Rows 2-3: Net 1 knot in each loop over the same mesh stick used in row 1.

Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" mesh stick.

Row 5: Net 2 loops together across the row over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Rows 6-7: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" mesh stick

Row 8: Net 6 knots in the first loop, *net 1 knot in the next loop, net 6 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to * over a 1/4" mesh stick.

Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop over a #1 knitting needle.









This is how the netting looked following the instructions.










Here are my instructions for the way the photo looked (without the net embroidery).

Row 1: Net an even number of loops (not a multiple of 4) in the foundation loop over a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick.  The sample has 10 loops.

Rows 2-3: Net 1 knot in each loop over the same mesh stick used in row 1.

Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" mesh stick.

Row 5: Net 2 loops together across the row over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" mesh stick

Row 7: Net 6 knots in the first loop, *net 1 knot in the next loop, net 6 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to * over a 1/4" mesh stick.

Row 8-9: Net 1 knot in each loop over a #1 knitting needle.






This is how the netting looked following the photo.




Saturday, July 25, 2015

Netted Tab (as an edge) from Tatting and Netting



I liked the way the Netted Tab looked on page 146 of Tatting and Netting or page 149 of this version of the book.  I decided to see if I could use the instructions to create an edge. The problem arose when I tried to match the instructions with the photo.  They were not the same. I decided to make both versions.  Here is how I interpreted the instructions. I adapted the pattern for rows instead of curved around the bottom of the tab.

Make a net chain of 24 knots (12 loops) over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.  Place the loops on one side of the chain on a foundation loop.

Row 1: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 2: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 5/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 5: Net 2 loops together across the row over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 7: Net bunches of loops (as described on page 85 of Tatting and Netting) in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Form the long loops in row 2 into Sheaves using the instructions on page 112 of Tatting and Netting.







This is how the netting looked following the instructions.

















Here are my instructions for the way the photo looked (without the net embroidery).

Row 1: Net 12 loops into the foundation loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.  

Rows 2-4: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 5/8" flat mesh stick.

Rows 6-8: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/8" flat mesh stick.

Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 10: Net 2 loops together across the row over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 11: Net bunches of loops (as described on page 85 of Tatting and Netting) in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop over a 1/4" flat mesh stick.

Form the long loops in row 5 into Sheaves using the instructions on page 112 of Tatting and Netting.










This is how the netting looked following the photo.













Do you like one edge better than the other?  I think I like the second one better.



Saturday, July 18, 2015

Netted Nightcap Border from Tatting and Netting


The Netted Nightcap found on page 146 of this version of Tatting and Netting looks like a fun piece of netting to try.  However, since I am currently focusing on edges and borders, I decided to just make the border.





I used a 1/8" and 1/4" mesh sticks.  I began the sample with an odd number of loops and net 3 rows of plain netting on the 1/8" mesh stick.

Row 4:  Using the larger mesh, net 3 knots in each loop.

Row 5-6: Using the smaller mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 7: Using the smaller mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, *skip a loop, net 1 knot in the next loop*; repeat from * to *.


I made a variation of this edge by changing row 4 as follows: net 3 knots in the first loop, *skip a loop, net 3 knots in the next loop*; repeat from * to *.  All the other rows were the same.

This is how the variation looked.





Saturday, July 11, 2015

Netted Watch Pocket Edge from Tatting and Netting


This week's edge comes from a pattern for a pocket watch found on pages 145 and 145 of this version of Tatting and Netting.


This edge was made to go around the entire half-circle of the front of the pocket watch and therefore needed some changes to make the sample made with rows instead of rounds. Here are the instructions for the sample I made.  I used two mesh sticks: 1/8" and 1/4".


To begin, create 3 rows of netting using a 1/8" mesh stick by netting an odd number of loops net into the foundation loop.  Net 2 more rows with 1 knot in each loop.

First row of the edge:  Using a 1/4" mesh stick, net 3 knots into the first loop of the row, *skip the next loop, net 4 knots in one loop*; repeat from * to * across the row.

Second row of the edge: Using the 1/8" mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop of the last row.

Third row of the edge: Using the 1/8" mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop for 3 loops, *skip the next loop, net 1 knot in each loop for 3 loops*; repeat from * to * across the row.

Fourth row of the edge: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now using the 1/8" mesh stick, net 1 knot in the next loop, skip the loop over the loop skipped in the last row, net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, repeat form * to * ending with net the last 2 loops together.



Saturday, July 4, 2015

Bread Tray Cover Edge from Tatting and Netting


Pages 140-141 of this version of Tatting and Netting contain  instructions for a netted Bread Tray Cover.  There are two sizes of mesh sticks needed for this design.  I used a 1/2" and a 1/8" (or #3 knitting needle).


The edge contains what looks like two rows of alternating skipped loops.  In reality, there are 3 skipped loop in the upper row.  The lower loops are formed when a single loop is put up through the center skipped loop above it before a loop is net into that single loop.   

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Border of the Oriental Pattern for Long Window Curtains from Tatting and Netting


The Border of the Oriental Pattern for Long Window Curtains is found on page 142 of this version of Tatting and Netting. The instructions said to use a large and a small mesh stick and then it mentioned using a 1/2" mesh stick.  The first time I made the edge, I used the 1/2" mesh stick as the large mesh stick and a #3 knitting needle (1/8")  for the small mesh stick. The sample looked like this.





Since the last row look much bigger than the illustration in Tatting and Netting, I decided to try again. I used a 1/4" mesh stick for the large one and a 1/8" mesh stick for the small one.  I used the 1/2" mesh stick just on the row it was mentioned.

This second sample looked more like the illustration in Tatting and Netting.


Saturday, June 20, 2015

Border for Design for Antimacassars, Fichus, Darned Netting, Etc. from Tatting and Netting


This border, found on page 140 of Tatting and Netting, uses a #12 knitting needle for the small mesh stick and a 1/4" flat mesh stick for the large one.  The #12 knitting needle is equal to the 2 mm or 0 US.  If the edge is placed around a circular center, the  number of loops in the round before the border begins needs to be a multiple of 4.  If the edge is to be made going back and forth in rows, the number of loops before the edge is begun needs to be a multiple of 4 plus 1 (for example: 5, 9, 13, 21).