Saturday, October 25, 2014

Edging in Double Fan or Sheaf Design from Tatting and Netting and a Different Beginning for a Duffle-type Shoulder Bag



I have long enjoyed looking at the Double Fan or Sheaf Design, but could not find an explanation for how to make it until I found the Edging in Double Fan or Sheaf Design found on page 112 of Tatting and Netting, by Butterick Publishing Company.  This is the first of two ways explained in this book to create this Sheaf pattern.  I had hoped that it was strictly a net design; however, I discovered that it needed a hand-tied knot, made after the netting was finished, to form the Sheaf.



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I received an e-mail from Anthony Emery describing the technique he had used to start a duffle-type shoulder bag.

He said:  "After posting a photo of this bag at a forum I received requests for a tutorial. I adapted it from the book "Net Making" by Charles Holdgate. The tutorial only shows how to change from the flat netting that is made on the first row of netting to circular/tubular netting. I left the number of meshes and size of the gauge up to whoever tries the technique. . . . Here is a link to the tutorial http://pineapple.myfunforum.org/sutra3431.php#3431 and here is the bag."

Charles Holdgate used a 1", 1.5", and a 2" mesh stick.  The beginning row was made using the 1.5" mesh and the final round with doubled thread used the 2" mesh.  The rest of the bag was made using a 1" mesh.  Of course any size mesh could be used, depending on how you plan to use the bag.



When I asked Tony about the drawstring, he replied: "To make the drawstring I used the method shown here http://pineapple.myfunforum.org/about1654.html.  I used the same cord I used for making the bag. I tied a loop of twine between the fixed point and the drill (I did not triple the single cord as shown in the tutorial) and proceeded as shown.
It is MUCH easier and quicker to use this method. http://pineapple.myfunforum.org/about1668.html"

Now I just need to find a hand drill.  


Saturday, October 18, 2014

Netted Border, With Fringe from Tatting and Netting -- continued


I decided to re-do the Netted Border, with Fringe that I showed last week.  This week I made one change to the way the instructions were written. On the row after the puff stitch was made the instructions state: "Next row, -- Plain, with the quarter-inch mesh."  I changed it to: Next row -- *Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net 10 loops together (that's the nine loops of the puff stitch and one loop after the puff stitch)*, repeat from the * to *, ending with net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops.

I like this version better.  It has a knot at the top and bottom of the puff stitch .



My version of the instructions:

Fill two netting needles with thread - one of them with a single strand of thread, and the other with 3 strands of thread.

Row 1: Using a 1/4" mesh stick and the netting needle filled with the single strand of thread, net  a multiple of 3 loops + 2 loops (8, 11, 14, 17 for example) in the foundation loop. (the sample above uses 14)

Rows 2-6: Using the 1/4" mesh stick and the same netting needle, net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 7: Using a #6 (4 mm) knitting needle and the netting needle filled with 3 strands of thread, net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 8: Using a 1/4" mesh stick and the netting needle filled with the single strand of thread, net 1 knot in each three-strand loop, but twist the loop once before netting into it.

Row 9: Using a 3/8" mesh stick and the same netting needle as for row 8, *Net 1 knot in each loop for 3 loops, pass the thread over the mesh and up through the last loop just worked in, and continue this 9 times; then tie the netting knot in the regular way, except you do not put the thread over the mesh and into the next loop, instead, put the netting needle behind the 9 loops and out between the cluster and the last single loop made.*  Repeat from * to *, ending with net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops.

Row 10: using the 1/4" mesh stick and the netting needle filled with the single strand of thread, *Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net 10 loops together (that's the nine loops of the puff stitch and one loop after the puff stitch)*, repeat from the * to *, ending with net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops.

Row 11: repeat row 7.

Row 12: repeat row 8.

Cut strands of fringe as long as desired (the sample strands were about 5 inches long), and knot or tie 5 in each loop created in row 12.


Saturday, October 11, 2014

Netted Border, With Fringe from Tatting and Netting


While I tried to follow the directions for Netted Border, With Fringe found on page 112 of Tatting and Netting, by Butterick Publishing Company, I'm still not sure exactly what I was supposed to do to make the Puff . 

The instructions said "then tie in the regular way, except that you do not put the thread over the mesh and into the next loop, but around the 9 loops, or between the cluster and the last single loop."  This sounds like the knot would be on the top of the cluster.  There is a knot at the top and the bottom of the clusters; however, there is no instruction as to how to fasten the bottom of the cluster in the next row.  That just states, "Plain, with the quarter-inch mesh" and then continues on to the following row. There is no mention as to what to do with the bottoms of the 9 loops. 

This time I tied the knot through the 9 loops by moving the netting needle through the loops while they were still on the mesh stick and tying the knot at the bottom.

 
  


It looks close to the photo in the book, but not quite right where the puffs are. If I were to do it again (and I probably will), I think I will tie the knot around the top of the cluster and then on the next row I will net all the cluster together in one knot.

Saturday, October 4, 2014

Netted Lace from Tatting and Netting; Netting at the Big E


A picture makes it so much easier to understand the printed directions. Today I made a sample of Netted Lace from instructions found on page 111 of Tatting and Netting, by Butterick Publishing Company.  Either they forgot to mention a repeat of a three-row pattern, or they thought anyone could see in the photograph that it was repeated and so did not mention it.  They also did not mention the size of the three netting needles used.  I measured the photo and decided to try a 1/8", 1/4", and 3/8" mesh sticks. 

The instructions called for a netting needle filled with single thread and one filled with double thread. I did it they way they suggested. The double thread is quite noticeable on the edging.



Then I wondered what it would look like if the pattern was done just using a single thread. So I made it that way. It looks a little different, but I like it.  Which one I use will depend on where I'm using it.



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The Eastern States Exposition (The Big E) ended last Sunday. Last year the only netting were the three pieces I submitted.  This year there were there were six.  I submitted three: a doily (first place and a sponsor award),  an ornament (first place), and a shawl (first place and a sponsor award for best technical proficiency).





Two of my granddaughters submitted the rest. The twelve-year-old submitted a net bag and received a first-place ribbon and best in the youth division.



The ten-year-old submitted a long-handle net bag which received a third-place ribbon and a net headband which received a second-place ribbon.  She designed the headband and the flower on it.




I appreciate that the items submitted to the Big E are not in competition with others.  Each item is judged on its own merits.  Does it meet the standards for first, second, or third place?  If yes, then it receives that award. I also like the fact that the youth have their own division.  The beginners also have their own division.  Maybe next year I can get my daughter to enter something she has net.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Demonstrating Netting at the Eastern States Exposition


This week I did not find the time to make a new net edge.  The Eastern States Exposition (The Big E), a multi-state fair held in West Springfield, Massachusetts, opened September 12.  This year I've had the opportunity to demonstrate netting for parts of six days (about 35 hours).  It has been wonderful to introduce people to netting.  People kept telling me, "I never knew this existed."  That's why I was there!

Here is a look at my demonstration area.



On Wednesday, I made the two bags that are hanging in the center of the display board. The bags are very different: different bases, different mesh sticks sizes, different size bag, different number of loops in the rounds, different way to begin the handles, different thread/string used. Different is good - it helps keep me from being bored.
































Saturday, September 20, 2014

Netted Edging from Tatting and Netting


I love it when the patterns I'm trying to make have photographs or sketches.  The Netted Edging from page 111 and 112 of  Tatting and Netting, by Butterick Publishing Company, has a photograph. When I made it this week the instructions were fairly clear, but in one or two places it was difficult to know exactly what was meant.  The photo helped clear up those issues.  I'm not sure I did it the way the suggested, but I ended up with the look that was in the photo.

The final three rows of the instructions were very clear; however, only two of the rows were shown in the illustration.  The middle row of those instructions was not there.  Because I liked the way the photo looked, I went with it and eliminated the next to the last row of the written instructions.





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This past week, while demonstrating netting at the Eastern States Exposition (The Big E), I made two more bags for my daughter.



Even though they look different they do have some common features.

  1. They both have tied handles on a circular net bag. 
  2. They have the same number of knots in each round. This pattern went from 12 loops in round one to 48 loops in round 6.   
  3. They both have the same base.  





How are they different?

  1. One is large and the other small.  
  2. The body of the large bag has 4 fewer rounds than the small bag.
  3. One bag has one tied handle, while the other has two.
  4. The size of the mesh is different (1/4" for the small and 3/4" for the large).
  5. The type and size of cord they are made of varies in size. (medium-weight string for the large one and size 5 crochet thread for the small one).
  6. The location of the decreases of the handle changed.



The large bag handle (on the left) has the decreases along the edge of the handle.

The small bag handle (on the right) has the decreases in the center of the handle.











Saturday, September 13, 2014

Pointed, Net Edging from Tatting and Netting



This Pointed, Net Edging is found on page 110 of Tatting and Netting, by Butterick Publishing Company (published in 1895).  The mesh sticks used are a little vague: "a rather course bone needle" (I used a 1/4" flat mesh), "a quite coarse steel needle" (I used a #3 knitting needle), and "a little finer bone needle" (I used a #6 knitting needle).  My finished sample looked very close to the illustration in the book, so I think I guessed right.  The "quite coarse steel needle" is smaller than the "little finer bone needle" which is being compared to the "rather coarse steel needle" and not the "quite coarse steel needle."



It would be interesting to see what this edge looked like with larger or smaller mesh sticks.


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This week my youngest daughter mentioned that she could use a small mesh bag.  Being a kind mother, I volunteered to make it for her. And as I was in a creative mood, I tried a new center.  


I think I'll call it the Swirl Center. 

The bag was just plain circular netting.

I decided to try a Lacy Triangle Decrease Stitch for the handle and with my daughter's approval I put netted fringe on the ends of the tied handle.



Here's another photo showing the handle's Lacy Triangle Decrease Stitch more clearly.


Now she tells me she would like a bag larger than this one, but smaller than a laundry bag.