Saturday, August 11, 2018

A Rectangular Square-Mesh Frame an Even Number of Squares in the Width and in the Length


Having made the rectangular square-mesh frame with an odd number in the width and in the length, I wondered what would be different if I used even numbers in both the width and the length. I decided to make a frame with the following numbers:
  • the outer width 14 squares and the inner width 4 squares
  • the outer length 16 squares and the inner length 6 squares
  • the border 5 squares 



Instructions:


Before starting the actual netting:
1.       Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
2.       Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
a.   Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leave a long tail, at least 6 to 8 inches.
b.   Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
c.     Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
d.    Tighten the slipknot.                    
3.       Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
4.       Choose a mesh stick.


Increase Portion of the Rectangle
Row 1
Net 2 more knots into the foundation loop.  (2 loops in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2
Net 1 knot in the first loop; increase by netting two knots in the 2nd loop. (3 loops in the row)
Row 3
Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
Rows 4-11
Continue repeating row 3. (12 loops in final row)


Forming the top of the rectangle
Row 12
(first partial row) Divide the number of loops in half and net 1 knot in each loop for half of the loops.  (6 loops in the row)
Row 13
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. The increase is on the outer edge. (7 loops in the row)
Row 14
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is on the inner edge. (6 loops in the row)
 

Turn Corner and Start Side
Row 15
 Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now using a mesh stick, net 1 more knot in that loop, net 1 knot in each remaining loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 16
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. The increase is now on the outer edge. (7 loops in the row)
Row 17
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is now on the inner edge. (6 loops in the row)
Row 18
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. The increase is now on the outer edge. (7 loops in the row)
Row 19
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is now on the inner edge. (6 loops in the row)

Cut the thread on the inner edge.




Start the Second Half of the Square
Tie the thread from the needle onto the bottom of the first loop of the last complete increase row.
1.       Tie the end of the thread from the shuttle to the appropriate loop.
2.       Without using a mesh stick, tie a netting knot into the same loop.
3.       Untie the original knot that joined the shuttle to the loop, leaving just the netting knot.

Row 12
 (second part of the first partial row)
Net 1 more knot in the loop in which the needle is tied, net 1 knot in each loop for the remaining loops on this partial row. (6 loops in the row)
Row 13
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, increase by netting 2 knots in the last loop. The increase is on the outer edge. (7 loops in the row)
Row 14
 Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is now on the inner edge. (6 loops in the row)
Row 15
 Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now using a mesh stick, net 1 more knot in that loop, net 1 knot in each remaining loop.
Row 16
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, increase by netting 2 knots in the last loop. The increase is on the outer edge. (7 loops in the row)

Turn Corner and Start Bottom Side
Row 17
 Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now using the mesh stick, net 1 more knot in that first loop, net 1 knot in each of the remaining loops. (6 loops in the row)
Row 18
 Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, net 2 loops in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 19
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is now on the outer edge. (6 loops in the row)

Cut the thread on the inner edge.

Join Partial Rows and Decrease
Row 22
 Net together the first and second loops, net 1 knot in each loop until the two closed loops, net the two closed loops together (joining both partial rows), net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together.  (11 loops in the row)
Row 23
 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together.

Repeat Row 23 until there are two loops left. 
           
Tie the Last Corner              
Finish the final row by netting these two loops together, but without a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Tie the First Corner
Remove the foundation loop from row one of the net.
Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.


Saturday, August 4, 2018

A Rectangular Square-Mesh Frame with an Odd Number of Squares in the Width and the Length


Once I knew I could design a square frame using square-mesh netting, I decided to net a frame in a rectangular piece of netting. This frame has a width of 17 squares and an length of 25 squares along the outer edge. There are 7 squares in the width of the inner rectangle and 15 squares in the length of the inner rectangle.



Instructions:

Before starting the actual netting:
1.       Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
2.       Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
a.   Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leave a long tail, at least 6 to 8 inches.
b.   Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
c.     Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
d.    Tighten the slipknot.                    
3.       Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
4.       Choose a mesh stick.


Increase Portion of the Rectangle
Row 1
Net 2 more knots into the foundation loop.  (2 loops in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2
Net 1 knot in the first loop; increase by netting two knots in the 2nd loop. (3 loops in the row)
Row 3
Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
Rows 4-11
Continue repeating row 3. (12 loops in final row)


Forming the top of the rectangle
Row 12
(first partial row) Divide the number of loops in half and net 1 knot in each loop for half of the loops.  (6 loops in the row)
Row 13
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. The increase is on the outer edge. (7 loops in the row)
Row 14
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is on the inner edge. (6 loops in the row)
Rows 15-17
Repeat rows 13 and 14. The last row will be an increase row.
 

Turn Corner and Start Side
Row 18
Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together, net 1 more knot in those two loops.  (7 loops in the row)
Row 19
Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is now on the outer edge. (6 loops in the row)
Row 20
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. The increase is now on the inner edge. (7 loops in the row)
Rows 21-32
Repeat rows 19-20. The last row will be an increase row.

Cut the thread on the inner edge.

Start the Second Half of the Rectangle
Tie the thread from the needle to the bottom of the first loop of the last complete increase row.
1.       Tie the end of the thread from the shuttle to the appropriate loop.
2.       Without using a mesh stick, tie a netting knot into the same loop.
3.       Untie the original knot that joined the shuttle to the loop, leaving just the netting knot.

Row 12
 (second part of the first partial row)
Net 1 more knot in the loop in which the needle is tied, net 1 knot in each loop for the remaining loops on this partial row. (6 loops in the row)
Row 13
 Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, increase by netting 2 knots in the last loop. The increase is on the outer edge. (7 loops in the row)
Row 14
 Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is now on the inner edge. (6 loops in the row)
Rows 15-25
Repeat rows 13 and 14. The last row will be an increase row.

Turn Corner and Start Bottom Side
Row 26
Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together, net 1 more knot in those two loops.  (7 loops in the row)
Row 27
Net 1 knot in each loop, except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. The decrease is now on the outer edge. (6 loops in the row)
Row 28
Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, net 2 loops in the last loop. The increase is now on the inner edge. (7 loops in the row)
Rows 29-32
Repeat rows 27 and 28. The last row will be an increase row.

Cut the thread on the inner edge.

Join Partial Rows and Decrease
Row 33
 Net together the first and second loops, net 1 knot in each loop until the two closed loops, net the two closed loops together (joining both partial rows), net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together.  (11 loops in the row)
Row 34
 Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (10 loops in the row)
Rows 39-43
Repeat Row 34 until there are two loops left. 
           
Tie the Last Corner              
Finish the final row by netting these two loops together, but without a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Tie the First Corner
Remove the foundation loop from row one of the net.
Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Top-down Net Bag with Two (6-loop) Net Handles


I've been going back through my patterns to see what I still need to remake so I can check the pattern and photograph it. I decided to try this Top-down Net Bag with Two (6-loop) Net Handles. The two handles are made first and then joined together. I was able to fix some of the typos and clarify the instructions in other sections. This bag has 906 knots. It's made with a 3/4" and a 1" mesh stick.



Saturday, July 21, 2018

Dawn


This is another of those doilies made years ago that I only had a partial representation of what it looked like. I was not only remaking the doily, but I was also revising the instructions to make them work out mathematically.

One of my more frustrating netting experiences came when I had almost finished the rows necessary to create the 21 points. I realized that the final rows were not mathematically compatible to having each point reduce to a single increase stitch. The problem was 12 rows back, at the beginning of the point section, where I had put an even number of loops between the initial increase stitches. I needed to cut off all 12 rows (about 5,000 knots) and do it again. However, I did make sure to revise the instructions so as to put an odd number of loops between the increases.



I'm grateful that I don't still need to reproduce a circular doily on a rectangular photocopy machine. Digital cameras are so much easier.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Clusteria


Technology has come a long way since I started netting. When I first made the doily I call Clusteria,  I needed to use a rectangular photocopy machine to try to record a circular doily that was 34.5 inches in diameter in order to have a visual copy of what I had created. I did not get a picture of the entire doily, but I had something to remind me what the it looked like.

Now that I have a digital camera, I remade the doily so I could get an image of the entire doily.


Saturday, July 7, 2018

Oval Net Doily


Most of the oval netting I have done starts in the middle with several rows of plain netting before continuing around all four sides of the rectangular center.

Many years ago I was browsing online and I caught sight of what I thought was an oval netted doily. That is how it was advertised and what the photo looked like. It had a unique center. I purchased it and eagerly awaited its arrival. When it arrived, I discovered that it was not netted but crocheted. Recently I finally sat down to figure out how to get that type of center in an oval net doily. It took some trial and error, but here's what I came up with.





I think it works.

The first row is the hardest. The remaining 14 rows are fairly straight forward.


Oval Net Doily
943 knots in this doily
23” diameter

Instructions

Tie a connecting knot (CK) at the end of each round to form the last loop of that round.

Center

Round 1: Starting Oval Center
                mesh stick: 1.5 inch

First circle
  • Create a slip knot loop that slides on the loose end, leaving a 2-yard tail.
  • Put a foundation loop cord through the slipknot loop, tie it into a circle thereby forming a foundation loop, and attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  • Net 15 loops over the foundation loop, the last loop is NOT tied with a CK.
  1. Remove the foundation loop cord from the slipknot loop.
  2. Place the loose end which was just removed from the netting needle through the slipknot loop.
  3. Pull the loose end thread and form the loops into a circle. Once all the extra thread is pulled up, tie an overhand and tighten it up against the second circle.


Second Circle
  • To form the slipknot, take the center thread across and behind the loose end thread; pull up the loop, formed and tighten. If the distance from the slipknot to the end of the first circle is 3.75 inches, the entire distance of center thread to the end of the slipknot loop should be 4.25 inches. You may need to adjust where the slipknot is as well as the length of the slipknot loop.
  • Now lengthen the slipknot loop as far as it will go. The slipknot will move next to the overhand knot tied at the end of the first circle.  The loop formed by the knot is now 2 ½ inches long.
  • Put a foundation loop cord through the slipknot loop.
  • Fill another netting needle with the 2-yard loose end.
  • Net 16 loops over the foundation loop, the last loop is NOT tied tied with a CK.
Form the Center

  1. Remove the thread from the netting needle.
  2. Remove the mesh stick.
  3. Remove the foundation loop cord from the slipknot loop.
  4. Pull the netting needle and first circle through the slipknot loop of the second circle.
  5. Once everything is through the slipknot loop, gently pull on the first circle and center thread to tighten the center of the second circle. When the center of the circle is tight, use the loose end and the center thread to tie an overhand knot tightly against the center of the second circle.
  6. Twist the loose end around the center thread 24 times, put the end through the center of the first circle, tie the thread from the netting needle and the loose end together with an overhand knot against the center of the first circle, then tie a CK to form a loop the same length as the other loops in round 1.
  7. Fasten the center of the first circle to a pillow, stretch the center thread taut, pin the center of the second circle to the same pillow.


Round 2
                mesh stick: 5/8”
Net 1 knot in each loop of circle 2 and then circle 1. (32 loops in the round)


Rounds 3-4
                mesh stick: 5/8”
 Net 1 knot in each loop. (32 loops in round)

Round 5
                mesh stick: 3/4”
 Net 1 knot in each loop. (32 loops in round)

Round 6
                mesh stick: 1/2”
*Net 1 knot in the next loop, wrap the thread once around the mesh stick and net 1 knot in the following loop*; repeat from * to *. (32 loops in round)

Round 7
                mesh stick: 1.5”
Net 4 more knots in the loop formed by the CK, skip the short loop, *net 5 knots in the next loop, skip the short loop*; repeat from * to *. (80 loops the round)

Rounds 8-10
                mesh stick: 1/2”
Net 1 knot in each loop. (80 loops in round)

Round 11
                mesh stick: 1”
Net 1 knot in each loop. (80 loops in round)

Round 12-15
                mesh stick: 1/2”
 Net 1 knot in each loop. (80 loops in round)

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Ivy Stitch - Rectangular Shawl


Usually, when I make a rectangular shawl, the rows start at one wrist, progress across the back, and end at the other wrist (the longest dimension of the shawl). That way I can easily try it on to see if it is the right size. This shawl was different.



I like the way the Ivy Decorative Stitch hangs when it is turned 90 degrees and the sides of the netting become the top and bottom.




So, I started at one wrist (dark brown yarn) and net back and forth on a large mesh stick. Then I increased the number of loops and worked across the shoulder, the back (golden colored yarn), and the other shoulder. Finally, I decreased the number of loops and worked back and forth across the rows to the other wrist.

Back of the shawl
Front of the shawl




















If I were to make this again, I would make it all in one color and start with the number of loops that were used across the back of the shawl.