Saturday, July 19, 2014

Wide Netted Edging from The Priscilla Netting Book


This week I made the Wide Netted Edging, figure 59, from page 27 of The Priscilla Netting Book, by Belle Robinson, editor, (published in 1914).  Following the information I learned last week, I used the mesh sticks based on the circumference of the mesh stick, not the width.  The pattern called for three mesh sticks - a small: 3/8", a medium: 5/8", and a large: 7/8".  I used the following mesh sticks - a small: size 3 knitting needle, medium: size 8 knitting needle, and a large 3/8" flat mesh stick.



This edge needs to start with a multiple of 3.

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Netted Border with Fringe from The Priscilla Netting Book; mesh stick sizes; netting needle sizes; and The Lost Art of Netting


I was delighted to see that there were mesh-stick sizes given in the Netted Border with Fringe from The Priscilla Netting Book by Belle Robinson, editor, (published in 1914). An illustration is found on page 29, and the instructions are found starting at the bottom of page 31. The pattern specified a "small (5/8-inch) mesh-stick" and a "large (7/8-inch) mesh-stick."  That seemed rather large to me, but I made it.


 My sample measured about 10 inches square. 


Then someone in our knitting group (yes, I was netting at the local library's knitting group) pointed out that the fringe was supposed to be wound over a "2-inch measure." Then she asked, "Does that mean the mesh stick was not measured the same way as the fringe?" Her question made me think; I remembered that somewhere I had seen mesh stick sizes measured by the circumference of the mesh stick, not the width of the mesh stick. We decided to experiment.

Since I did not have a flexible tape measure, I marked a piece of thread with a knot 7/8" from the end and tried different size mesh sticks (flat and round) to see which one the thread would wrap around.  The 3/8" flat mesh was the closest.  So that became my large mesh.  I did the same thing with a 5/8"- long piece of thread.  The #5 knitting needle was the closest fit.  That became my new small mesh.

Repeating the instructions again with the smaller mesh sticks, I made the edge again.  It was much closer to my idea of the size a netted edging should be.


My smaller sample measured about 3.75 inches wide by 5 inches long.




Gauge can be so important.  In netting, gauge is determined by the size mesh stick used. To give you an idea of the size difference between the two samples, I'll show them here in the same photo.


I should have looked in the front of the book before starting any patterns contained in it, especially since it is an entire book about netting instead of just a couple of patterns. When I did, I found some important information.  Here is what was said about mesh sticks:


  • Mesh-sticks are numbered by the actual measure around the stick, as 3/8-inch, 5/8-inch, 7/8-inch, or 1 inch. The 7/8-inch corresponds very well with the "lead pencil" one often finds in directions. The 1-inch mesh-stick makes a mesh one-half inch square, and the same proportion is true of any other size.
There was also some interesting information about metal netting needles:
  • Netting-needles are offered in six sizes: Nos. 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, and 22, No. 22 being the finest. It is somewhat longer, but in width is the same size as illustrated at Fig. 1. Any of the needles can be used with mesh-sticks 5/8 inch or larger; No. 16 needle is the largest that can be used with 3/8-inch mesh-stick.
It would be nice to have that variety in metal mesh sticks today.  

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This month continues to be exciting for me.  On July 3, 2014, I published my first book: The Lost Art of Netting: A How-To Book with Pictures and Patterns for the Beginning Netter (Volume 1). This week it appeared on Amazon.


Saturday, July 5, 2014

Edging from The Priscilla Netting Book


This net edging, simply called Edging, is from The Priscilla Netting Book, by Belle Robinson, editor, (published in 1914). An illustration is found on page 33, and the instructions are found on page 48. The instructions include the size of the mesh sticks - 3/8" and 7/8". This makes the edge 7.5 inches long.





I also made a netting sample using a 1/8" and a 3/8" mesh stick. This seemed to me to be better suited for a handkerchief edging since it measures 3 and 3/8 inches long.



UPDATE: I found out the reason for the problem.  Only a week late. It looks like I chose new mesh sticks correctly.

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This month started off with some excitement for me.  The July / August issue of Piecework Magazine included my article about netting and two net bookmarks I designed.

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Pineapple Border Handkerchief Edge from Aunt Ellen's How-To Book on Needlework


The net edge pattern from Aunt Ellen's How-To Book on Needlework gives the edge for a handkerchief, including how to turn the corner.  I had a copy of the booklet and used my copy of the instructions to create the sample edge.  





It was only upon finishing it that I noticed the link to the section on netting does not include the instructions for the edging, so I have included the instructions here.

Pineapple Border Handkerchief Edge


You will need a handkerchief about 10 or 11 inches square or larger if desired. Mark the border in 1/8-inch intervals with a pencil, beginning at one corner and in the hem. Pin handkerchief to pillow by two corners to anchor for work. A number 22 netting needle was used and sizes 5 and 14 steel knitting needles. This is a very fine delicate edge.

Rnd 1: Start the first stitch on all handkerchiefs 3/4-inch from one comer. With a sewing needle, in lieu of a netting needle and approximately 24 inches or more of number 100 crochet thread, net plain, over a number 14 knitting needle through each mark completely around handkerchief.

Rnd 2: Over a number 14 knitting needle and using a netting needle, * net plain up to within 6 lps (loops) of the next corner, net 2 in each of these 6 lps, net 2 in each of the next 6 lps around the corner, repeat from * around. This adds fullness in 6 lps on each side of every comer. Do not put too much thread on the netting needle for the first two rounds.

Rnd 3: Over number 14 knitting needle, net plain all around.

Rnd 4: Over number 5 knitting needle, net plain all around.

Rnd 5: Over number 5 knitting needle, net 2 lps together all around.

Rnd 6: Over number 5 knitting needle, net 5 in each lp around.

Rnds 7, 8: Over number 14 knitting needle net plain.

Rnd 9: Over number 14 knitting needle, * sk (skip) the first lp (lp that divides the groups or pineapples), net 4 plain; repeat from * around. Each time a lp is skipped the thread should be made a little longer to allow the pineapple to come to a point.

Rnd 10: Over number 14 knitting needle, * sk a lp, net 3 plain, repeat from * around.

Rnd 11: Over number 14 knitting needle, * sk a lp, net 2 plain, repeat from * around.


I made the following changes to convert the instructions from rounds to rows :

Row 1: Start with an even number (I used 10 in the sample pictured above).

Row 2: Over a number 14 knitting needle and using a netting needle, * net plain (1 knot in each loop).

Rows 3-8: same as in the original instructions.

Row 9: Over number 14 knitting needle, * net 4 plain, skip the first loop (loop that divides the groups or pineapples); repeat from * around. End by netting the last 2 loops together.

Row 10: Over number 14 knitting needle, * net 3 plain, skip a loop,  repeat from * around. End by netting the last 2 loops together.

Row 11: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first stitch;  over number 14 knitting needle, net 1 knot in the next loop, * sk a lp, net 2 plain, repeat from * around. End by netting the last 2 loops together.

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Today I finished re-making Wedding Bells.  It is 17 inches in diameter.




Saturday, June 21, 2014

A Pretty Edging or Frill in Netting from The Home Book of Pleasure and Instruction


The final edging from page 308 of The Home Book of Pleasure and Instruction, by Laura Valentine and Mrs Aylmer, (published in 1867) is called A Pretty Edging or Frill in Netting. Like the other two edgings from this book, this edging is designed to have the netting turned and the edge placed along one of the sides of the initial strip of netting.  I did find the directions were a little vague.  Here is what I thought the author meant.





Using a #0 knitting needle, net eight stitches into the foundation loop; continue netting these stitches until you have a strip as long as you want the edging to be. Be sure to end with an odd number of rows. Remove the foundation loop and place it through the loops along the side of the netting away from the netting needle. Retie the foundation loop.

Turn the netting so you will net up the edge of the rows not attached to the foundation loop.

Row 1: 1/4" mesh
Net 3 knots into the next loop, skip a loop, net 3 knots into the following loop.
Rows 2-4: #0 kn
Net 1 knot in each loop.
Row 5: 1/4" mesh
Net 1 knot in each loop.
Row 6: #3 kn
Net 3 loops together with one knot; repeat across the row.
Row 7: #3 kn
Net 1 knot in each loop.
Row 8: 1/4" mesh
Net 3 knots into the next loop, skip a loop, net 3 knots into the following loop.
Rows 9-11: #0 kn
Net 1 knot in each loop.
Row 12: 1/4" mesh
Net 1 knot in each loop.
Row 13:#3 kn
Net 3 loops together with one knot; repeat across the row.
Row 14: 1/4"
Net 1 knot in each loop.
Row 16:#3 kn
Net 1 knot in each loop.

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After looking through my soon-to-be-printed book and making suggestions for corrections, my daughter made one final suggestion.  "You really should take the bag photo that has a black background and make the background white to match all the other bags on the page."

I explained that it could not be done with that photo since the yarn used was variegated.

She replied, "Why don't you just remake the bag with yarn that is not variegated?"

So I did.



Saturday, June 14, 2014

Another and Wider Net Edging from The Home Book of Pleasure and Instruction - continued


Last week I showed a second edging (and a variation) from  The Home Book of Pleasure and Instruction, by Laura Valentine and Mrs Aylmer, (published in 1867).  The net edging was called Another and Wider Edging. This week I tried another variation on this same edge.  This time, instead of having a single knot tied in the loops at the beginning and ending of the row, I net 3 knots in the first and last loops of the row.





Today I had the time to starch all three versions of this edge.



Which of the three versions do you like best?  I think I like version 2.

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This week I net two small bags.  I am calling them Puppet Pouches since they were made to hold small knit finger puppets. The instructions were the same except for the handles.





The bag on the left has a regular, single handle.

The bag on the right has a twist in the handle that makes the entire bag a moebius bag.  That means that the entire bag has only one surface: no back or front, no inside or outside, just one surface.

If I were to place my finger on the handle and move it slowly along the handle, I would be able to go along the handle, the outside of the bag, and the inside the bag and end up where I had started without taking my finger off the bag.

It blows my mind every time I think about it.










Saturday, June 7, 2014

Another and Wider Net Edging from The Home Book of Pleasure and Instruction


I tried a second edging from  The Home Book of Pleasure and Instruction, by Laura Valentine and Mrs Aylmer, (published in 1867).  This net edging was called Another and Wider Edging.




Like the one I did last week, this edge is done in a long strip and then the netting is turned on its side. The final two rows of the edging are net into the side.  

It is hard to know what size mesh sticks were used.  The book has a circle for one size and a rectangle for the other.  The problem is that I don't know if the printed copy I made is the same size as the original book.  That could make a difference.  I measured the diameter of the circle (1/4") and the length of the rectangle (3/4") and decided to keep the same ratio, just smaller.  I used a #3 knitting needle, which is close to a 1/8" diameter, and a 3/8" flat mesh.

I also tried making this edge without turning it on the side.  There is certainly a difference in the look of these two edges.   



I did not have time to starch either sample today.  Possibly, when I pin them out and starch them, they will look closer to the same shape.