Saturday, February 6, 2016

Vandyke Border with Square Meshes from Guipure d'Art Netting


In 1879, Mlle. Eleonore Riego de la Branchardiere published Guipure d'Art Netting.   As she explains in her introduction: "Guipure d'Art or Cluny Lace, is formed by first making a foundation of Netting, and afterwards filling in the Meshes of the Network with various stitches formed in geometrical designs."

On pages 16 and 17 she gives a very clear description of how to net a square-mesh Vandyke border. I have not done the embroidery on the netting.



There was only one place where I did not follow her instructions.  That was at the beginning.  She starts with one loop and nets two knots into it to form two loops.  I have never been able to get that beginning to form the first square correctly.

Here is the way I worded the instructions.

Forming the first corner:
Tie the thread from the netting needle onto the foundation loop, leaving a 6" tail.
Row 1: Net 2 knots in the foundation loop.
Row 2: Net 1 knot in the first loop and 2 knots in the last loop.
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop.

Forming the Vandykes
Row 1: Net 1 knot in each loop. (4 loops)
Row 2: Net 1 knot in each loop for 3 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop. (5 loops)
Row 4: Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops)
Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop for 5 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop for 6 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop. (8 loops)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop for 7 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops)
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop for 5 loops, turn the netting and prepare to start the next row, leaving the other 4 loops to form one side of the Vandyke.
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (6 loops)

Repeat from Row 5 to Row 12 until the border is as long as desired.

Creating a straight edge at the end of the last Vandyke by repeating rows 5-7 and decreasing on the next 3 rows.

Row 5: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops)
Row 6: Net 1 knot in each loop for 5 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops)
Row 7: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops)
Row 8: Net 1 knot in each loop for 5 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (6 loops)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops)
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (5 loops)


Because of the way I started the netting, one more step is needed to form the first square of the netting.
  1. Remove the foundation loop from row 1 of the netting.
  2. Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle.
  3. Place the foundation-loop cord through another row of meshes.
  4. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle and attach it to a tension device.
  5. Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.














Saturday, January 30, 2016

A Pretty Edging or Frill in Netting from The Young Women's Book


Here is the third and final net edge from page 59 of The Young Woman's Book: a useful manual for everyday life by Mrs. Valentine.  Like the other two edges A Pretty Edging or Frill in Netting was made by creating a strip of netting as long as needed. The remainder of the edge is net onto one side of the strip of netting. The strip is then sewed to whatever you wanted the netting to decorate.




Here is my diamond mesh version of the instructions.

You will need an odd number of loops along the side of the netting to have things work out properly. The number of rows you make in your strip determines the number of loops you will have when you are ready to put the final rows along the side of the netting strip. 

To figure out how many rows you need to make, take the number of loops you want to have along the side when you begin netting there, multiply that number by 2, then add 1 to the result
          for this sample (9 x 2) + 1 = 19 rows

OR 

To figure out how many loops a certain number of rows will produce, take that odd number, subtract 1, then divide by 2
          for this sample (19-1) / 2 = 9 loops along the side


Row 1: using a #0 knitting needle 
Net 7 loops into the foundation loop.

Rows 2-23: using a #0 knitting needle
Net 1 knot in each loop. Cut the thread at the end of the row.

Remove the foundation loop. Tie the thread from the netting shuttle to the loose end hanging from row 1. Run the foundation loop through the loops along  the other side of the netting just finished.

Along the side of the netting

Row 1: using a 1/4" mesh stick and working along one side of the netting
Net 3 knot in the first loop, *skip the next loop, net 3 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to *.

Rows 2-4: using a #0 knitting needle
Turn the netting and work back across the loops just created. Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 5: using a 1/4" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop. 

Row 6: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 3 loops together along the entire row.

Row 7: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop

Row 8: using a 1/4" mesh stick
Net 3 knots in each loop. 

Rows 9-11: using a #0 knitting needle
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 12: using a 1/4" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop. 

Row 13: using a #0 knitting needle
Net 3 loops together along the entire row.

Row 14-15: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop.



If you don't want to net along the side of the strip, here is a top-down version.






The following instructions create a sample about the same size as the one above. These instructions go from the top of the netting to bottom of the netting.

Row 1:  using a #0 knitting needle 
Net 11 loops into the foundation loop.
Rows 2-15: using a #0 knitting needle 
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 16: using a 1/4" mesh stick
Net 3 knot in the first loop, *skip the next loop, net 3 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to *.

Rows 17-19: using a #0 knitting needle
  Net 1 knot in each knot.

Row 20: using a 1/4" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop. 

Row 21: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 3 loops together along the entire row.

Row 22: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop

Row 23: using a 1/4" mesh stick
Net 3 knots in each loop. 

Rows 24-26: using a #0 knitting needle
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 27: using a 1/4" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop. 

Row 28: using a #0 knitting needle
Net 3 loops together along the entire row.

Row 29-30: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Saturday, January 23, 2016

Another and Wider Edge from The Young Women's Book


Here is the second net edge from page 59 of The Young Woman's Book: a useful manual for everyday life by Mrs. Valentine.  Like the first edge (from last week) Another and Wider Edge was made by creating a strip of netting as long as needed. The remainder of the edge is net onto one side of the strip of netting. The strip is then sewed to whatever you wanted the netting to decorate.




Here is my diamond mesh version of the instructions.

You will need an odd number of loops along the side of the netting to have things work out properly. The number of rows you make in your strip determines the number of loops you will have when you are ready to put the final two rows along the side of the netting strip. 

To figure out how many rows you need to make, take the number of loops you want to have along the side when you begin netting there, multiply that number by 2, then add 1 to the result
          for this sample (9 x 2) + 1 = 19 rows

OR 

To figure out how many loops a certain number of rows will produce, take that odd number, subtract 1, then divide by 2
          for this sample (19-1) / 2 = 9 loops along the side


Row 1: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 8 loops into the foundation loop.

Rows 2-19: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop. Cut the thread at the end of the row.

Remove the foundation loop. Tie the thread from the netting shuttle to the loose end hanging from row 1. Run the foundation loop through the loops along  the other side of the netting just finished.

Along the side of the netting
Row 1: using a 3/8" mesh stick and working along one side of the netting
Net 3 knot in the first loop, *skip the next loop, net 3 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to *.

Row 2: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Turn the netting and work back across the loops just created. Net 1 knot in each loop.


If you don't want to net along the side of the strip, here is a top-down version.




The following instructions create a sample about the same size as the one above. These instructions go from the top of the netting to bottom of the netting.

Row 1: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 9 loops into the foundation loop.
Rows 2-17: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 18: using a 3/8" mesh stick 
Net 3 knot in the first loop, *skip the next loop, net 3 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to *.

Row 19: Using a #8 knitting needle or 1/4" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Saturday, January 16, 2016

Edgings in Netting from The Young Women's Book



The Young Woman's Book: a useful manual for everyday life by Mrs. Valentine, was published in 1877.  It contains three netted edges on page 59.  All three are made by creating a strip of netting as long as needed to sew onto whatever you wanted the netting to edge. Then the remainder of the edge is net onto one side of the strip of netting and the strip is then sewed to whatever you wanted the netting to decorate.

The first of these: Edgings in Netting is very plain.




Here is my diamond mesh version of the instructions.


Row 1: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 6 loops into the foundation loop.

Rows 2-15: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Remove the foundation loop. Tie the thread from the netting shuttle to the loose end hanging from row 1. Run the foundation loop through the loops along the other side of the netting just finished.

Along the side of the netting

Row 1: using a #8 knitting needle or 1/4" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop along the other side.


If you don't want to net along the side of the strip, here is a top-down version.


The following instructions create a sample about the same size as the one above. These instructions go from the top of the netting to bottom of the netting.

Row 1: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 6 loops into the foundation loop.

Rows 2-13: using a #3 knitting needle or 1/8" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 14: using a #8 knitting needle or 1/4" mesh stick
Net 1 knot in each loop.

Saturday, January 9, 2016

Long and Crossed Loops from The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable


This Edge was #46 on page 134 of The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable. The illustration is found on page 133 of the same book.

I decided to post edges for items #47-#50 before posting this edge, #46 mostly because I still could not get my sample to look like the illustration in the book.  I finally decided the problem was that I used size 20 crochet thread instead of the silk and yarn called for in the instructions.  The other possibility was that the illustration was an optical illusion and not possible to create exactly as shown.

Many net edges do not have a front or back.  They look the same or very similar regardless of which side you are viewing.  That is not the case with this edge.  







When viewing one side of the netting, there is a loop that is not attached to the netting except for the top knots. It shows as a half-circle on top of the rest of the stitch.  

















When viewing the other side of the netting, that loop is barely visible between the legs of the stitch, hiding behind the rest of the stitch.













In making this sample, I used size 20 crochet thread, a 1/8" flat mesh stick, and a 1/4" flat mesh stick. I also filled two netting needles with thread: one with a single strand of thread and the other with two strands of thread held together while I filled the netting needle (double thread).

Here is my diamond mesh version of the instructions.  This stitch pattern needs to start with an odd number of loops.


Row 1:  using 1/8" flat mesh stick and the single-thread filled netting needle
     Net 9 knots in the foundation loop.

Row 2:  using 1/8" flat mesh stick and the single-thread filled netting needle
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 3: using 1/4" flat mesh stick and the double-thread filled netting needle
     Net 1 knot in the first loop, *net 2 knots in the next loop, net 1 knot in the following loop*; repeat from * to *.

Row 4:  using 1/8" flat mesh stick and the single-thread filled netting needle
     Treat each double-thread loop as 1 loop. 
    *Take the open loop at the left of the closed loop,
     Pass it up through the closed loop;
     Net 1 knot in the open loop
     Take the next open loop and pass it up through the same closed loop
     Net 1 knot in this 2nd open loop*; repeat from * to *

Row 5: using 1/8" flat mesh stick and the single-thread filled netting needle
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 6:  using 1/4" flat mesh stick and the double-thread filled netting needle
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 7:  using 1/8" flat mesh stick and the single-thread filled netting needle
     Treat each double-thread loop as 1 loop and net 1 knot in each double-thread loop.

Row 8:  using 1/8" flat mesh stick and the single-thread filled netting needle
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 9: using 1/4" flat mesh stick and the double-thread filled netting needle
     Net 1 knot in the first loop, *net 2 knots in the next loop, net 1 knot in the following loop*; repeat from * to *.

Row 10:  using 1/8" flat mesh stick and the single-thread filled netting needle
     Treat each double-thread loop as 1 loop. 
    *Take the open loop at the left of the closed loop,
     Pass it up through the closed loop;
     Net 1 knot in the open loop
     Take the next open loop and pass it up through the same closed loop
     Net 1 knot in this 2nd open loop*; repeat from * to *

Row 11: using 1/8" flat mesh stick and the single-thread filled netting needle
     Net 1 knot in each loop.



Saturday, January 2, 2016

Border of Design for Darned Netting from The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable


This Border was from #50 on page 135 of The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable. The illustration is found on page 136 of the same book. It was meant to frame a piece of darned netting.




Here is my diamond mesh version of the instructions.  This stitch pattern needs to start with an even number of loops.

Using a 00 knitting needle as a mesh stick and before starting the border, net 12 loops in the foundation loop. Then net 1 row of 1 knot in each loop.

Row 1:  using  1/4" flat mesh stick
     Net 2 knots in each loop.

Row 2:  using #00 knitting needle
     Net 2 loops together.

Row 3: using #00 knitting needle
     Net 1 knot in each loop

Row 4:  using 1/4" flat mesh stick
     Skip a loop, net 6 knots in the next loop, *skip a loop, net 1 knot in the next loop, skip a loop, net 6 knots in the following loop*; repeat from * to * ending with

skip a loop, net 1 knot in the last loop.

Row 5: using 1/4" flat mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 6:  using #00 knitting needle
     Twist each loop twice before netting 1 knot in the loop.


Saturday, December 26, 2015

Fringe from The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable


There are many net edges called Fringe. This one is #49 on page 135 of The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable. The illustration is found on page 136 of the same book.






Here is my diamond mesh version of the instructions.  This stitch pattern needs to start with an even number of loops.

Row 1:  using #2 knitting needle 
     Net 12 loops in the foundation loop.

Row 2:  using  3/4" flat mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 3: using #1 knitting needle 
     *Skip a loop, net 1 knot in the next loop, pass the skipped loop behind the netted loop, net into the skipped loop*; repeat from * to *.

Row 4:  using  3/4" flat mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.

Row 5: using #1 knitting needle 
     Net 1 knot in the first loop, *skip a loop, net 1 knot in the next loop, pass the skipped loop behind the netted loop, net into the skipped loop*; repeat from * 

to * ending with net 1 knot in the last loop.

Row 6:  using 1/4" flat mesh stick
     Net 1 knot in each loop.


Cut 96 two-inch lengths of thread.  Tie 8 lengths of thread into each loop made in row 6.



I wonder what it would look like if I:
  • used an 1/8" mesh stick instead of a 3/4" mesh stick. 
  • used a 1/4" mesh stick instead of a 3/4" mesh stick. 
  • passed the skipped loop in front of the netted loop.

Maybe some day I'll try it and see.