Saturday, July 14, 2018

Clusteria


Technology has come a long way since I started netting. When I first made the doily I call Clusteria,  I needed to use a rectangular photocopy machine to try to record a circular doily that was 34.5 inches in diameter in order to have a visual copy of what I had created. I did not get a picture of the entire doily, but I had something to remind me what the it looked like.

Now that I have a digital camera, I remade the doily so I could get an image of the entire doily.


Saturday, July 7, 2018

Oval Net Doily


Most of the oval netting I have done starts in the middle with several rows of plain netting before continuing around all four sides of the rectangular center.

Many years ago I was browsing online and I caught sight of what I thought was an oval netted doily. That is how it was advertised and what the photo looked like. It had a unique center. I purchased it and eagerly awaited its arrival. When it arrived, I discovered that it was not netted but crocheted. Recently I finally sat down to figure out how to get that type of center in an oval net doily. It took some trial and error, but here's what I came up with.





I think it works.

The first row is the hardest. The remaining 14 rows are fairly straight forward.


Oval Net Doily
943 knots in this doily
23” diameter

Instructions

Tie a connecting knot (CK) at the end of each round to form the last loop of that round.

Center

Round 1: Starting Oval Center
                mesh stick: 1.5 inch

First circle
  • Create a slip knot loop that slides on the loose end, leaving a 2-yard tail.
  • Put a foundation loop cord through the slipknot loop, tie it into a circle thereby forming a foundation loop, and attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  • Net 15 loops over the foundation loop, the last loop is NOT tied with a CK.
  1. Remove the foundation loop cord from the slipknot loop.
  2. Place the loose end which was just removed from the netting needle through the slipknot loop.
  3. Pull the loose end thread and form the loops into a circle. Once all the extra thread is pulled up, tie an overhand and tighten it up against the second circle.


Second Circle
  • To form the slipknot, take the center thread across and behind the loose end thread; pull up the loop, formed and tighten. If the distance from the slipknot to the end of the first circle is 3.75 inches, the entire distance of center thread to the end of the slipknot loop should be 4.25 inches. You may need to adjust where the slipknot is as well as the length of the slipknot loop.
  • Now lengthen the slipknot loop as far as it will go. The slipknot will move next to the overhand knot tied at the end of the first circle.  The loop formed by the knot is now 2 ½ inches long.
  • Put a foundation loop cord through the slipknot loop.
  • Fill another netting needle with the 2-yard loose end.
  • Net 16 loops over the foundation loop, the last loop is NOT tied tied with a CK.
Form the Center

  1. Remove the thread from the netting needle.
  2. Remove the mesh stick.
  3. Remove the foundation loop cord from the slipknot loop.
  4. Pull the netting needle and first circle through the slipknot loop of the second circle.
  5. Once everything is through the slipknot loop, gently pull on the first circle and center thread to tighten the center of the second circle. When the center of the circle is tight, use the loose end and the center thread to tie an overhand knot tightly against the center of the second circle.
  6. Twist the loose end around the center thread 24 times, put the end through the center of the first circle, tie the thread from the netting needle and the loose end together with an overhand knot against the center of the first circle, then tie a CK to form a loop the same length as the other loops in round 1.
  7. Fasten the center of the first circle to a pillow, stretch the center thread taut, pin the center of the second circle to the same pillow.


Round 2
                mesh stick: 5/8”
Net 1 knot in each loop of circle 2 and then circle 1. (32 loops in the round)


Rounds 3-4
                mesh stick: 5/8”
 Net 1 knot in each loop. (32 loops in round)

Round 5
                mesh stick: 3/4”
 Net 1 knot in each loop. (32 loops in round)

Round 6
                mesh stick: 1/2”
*Net 1 knot in the next loop, wrap the thread once around the mesh stick and net 1 knot in the following loop*; repeat from * to *. (32 loops in round)

Round 7
                mesh stick: 1.5”
Net 4 more knots in the loop formed by the CK, skip the short loop, *net 5 knots in the next loop, skip the short loop*; repeat from * to *. (80 loops the round)

Rounds 8-10
                mesh stick: 1/2”
Net 1 knot in each loop. (80 loops in round)

Round 11
                mesh stick: 1”
Net 1 knot in each loop. (80 loops in round)

Round 12-15
                mesh stick: 1/2”
 Net 1 knot in each loop. (80 loops in round)

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Ivy Stitch - Rectangular Shawl


Usually, when I make a rectangular shawl, the rows start at one wrist, progress across the back, and end at the other wrist (the longest dimension of the shawl). That way I can easily try it on to see if it is the right size. This shawl was different.



I like the way the Ivy Decorative Stitch hangs when it is turned 90 degrees and the sides of the netting become the top and bottom.




So, I started at one wrist (dark brown yarn) and net back and forth on a large mesh stick. Then I increased the number of loops and worked across the shoulder, the back (golden colored yarn), and the other shoulder. Finally, I decreased the number of loops and worked back and forth across the rows to the other wrist.

Back of the shawl
Front of the shawl




















If I were to make this again, I would make it all in one color and start with the number of loops that were used across the back of the shawl.

Saturday, June 23, 2018

Diamond Netting - Rectangular Net Shawl


I am trying to use up some of the yarn that has been given to me over the years. This shawl was made with a bulky weight yarn.  The stitch I used was Diamond Netting with 5 loops.



.
I thought this stitch would stretch up and down and thereby make the width longer, instead the stitch stretched from side to side. If I were to make it again, I would make more rows and start with fewer loops (maybe enough for 9 patterns instead of 15).





Saturday, June 16, 2018

Dancing Spider Shawl


For a change I thought to take a break from Square Mesh Netting. I have been working on other things for the past few years.

I had been given some variegated ribbon yarn several years ago. I knew I wanted to make a shawl with it, but I was not sure which pattern. Last year I started and finished the shawl I call Dancing Spider Shawl.






This shawl is made by starting at the center and working the rows back and forth, increasing as needed. This shape of shawl stays on my shoulders easier than a half circle or a rectangle.




Here is a close-up of the edge and the last three increase rows.




The back of the shawl

The front of the shawl























Saturday, June 9, 2018

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – Generic Instructions #2 - Starting from the Middle


Here are the second set of photos and generic instructions for making a rectangle of square-mesh starting from the middle. The photos and instructions given below are for rectangles that have an even width and an odd length or an odd width and an even length.

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 4 x 7 squares - Starting from the Middle



Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 3 x 6 squares - Starting from the Middle

Here are my instructions for creating these pieces of square-mesh netting.

I made it with size 20 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.

Selvage Edges - Generic Instructions (even width and odd length or odd width and even length)
W = the number of squares desired in the width of the finished rectangle
L = the number of squares desired in the length of the finished rectangle


Start the Rectangle
Row 1: Using the small mesh stick, net as many more knots into the foundation loop as needed to obtain 1 more loop than you wish to have on each edge of the rectangle. (W + 1 loops in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2: Using the large mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop. (W + 1 loops in the row)
Row 3: Using the large mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops; net those last 2 loops together. (W loops in the row)
Continue by repeating Row 3 until there are only 2 loops in the row. (For each additional row, the number of loops will decrease by 1.)   When there are only 2 loops on a row, net those 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread. Remove the netting from the foundation loop (which unties the knots created in Row 1) and undo the former knots in Row 1 to straighten the loops. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of Row 1.

Lengthen the Rectangle
1.       (Increase Row): Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop; net 2 knots in the last loop.  (W + 2 loops in the row)
2.       (Decrease Row): Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop; skip the last loop and turn the netting. (W + 1 loops in the row)
Repeat these 2 rows until the number of squares on the long side of the rectangle equals L – 1, OR until the number of rows equals L.
3.       Net 1 knot in each loop. (W + 1 loops in the row)

Finish the Rectangle
1.       (Decrease Row) Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops; net the last 2 loops together. (W loops in the row)
2.       Continue by repeating the decrease row until there are only 2 loops in the row. (For each additional row, the number of loops will decrease by 1.)   When there are only 2 loops on a row, net those 2 loops together without using a mesh stick. Cut the thread and remove the netting from the foundation loop.

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – Generic Instructions #1 - Starting from the Middle


Once I had finished making rectangles for all four number of square variations  (even width with even length; odd width with odd length, even width with odd length, and odd width with even length) I checked to see if any of the instructions matched. To my delight, the instructions were the same for odd width with odd length and even width with odd length. Those rectangles which had even width with odd length, and odd width with even length used the same instructions. That meant there were only two different sets of generic instructions for rectangles of square-mesh that started from the middle of the rectangle.

The photos and instructions given below are for rectangles that have an even width and length or an odd width and length.


Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 3 x 7 squares - Starting from the Middle

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 4 x 6 squares - Starting from the Middle

Here are my instructions for creating these pieces of square-mesh netting.

I made it with size 20 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.

Selvage Edges - Generic Instructions (even width and length or odd width and length)
W = the number of squares desired in the width of the finished rectangle
L = the number of squares desired in the length of the finished rectangle

Start the Rectangle
Row 1: Using the small mesh stick, net as many more knots into the foundation loop as needed to obtain 1 more loop than you wish to have on each edge of the rectangle. (W + 1 loops in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2: Using the large mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop. (W + 1 loops in the row)
Row 3: Using the large mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops; net those last 2 loops together. (W loops in the row)
Continue by repeating Row 3 until there are only 2 loops in the row. (For each additional row, the number of loops will decrease by 1.)   When there are only 2 loops on a row, net those 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread. Remove the netting from the foundation loop (which unties the knots created in Row 1) and undo the former knots in Row 1 to straighten the loops. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of Row 1.

Lengthen the Rectangle
1.       (Increase Row): Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop; net 2 knots in the last loop.  (W + 2 loops in the row)
2.       (Decrease Row): Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop; skip the last loop and turn the netting. (W + 1 loops in the row)
Repeat these 2 rows until the number of squares on the long side of the rectangle equals L – 1, OR until the number of rows equals L.

Finish the Rectangle
1.       (Decrease Row) Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops; net the last 2 loops together. (W loops in the row)
2.       Continue by repeating the decrease row until there are only 2 loops in the row. (For each additional row, the number of loops will decrease by 1.)   When there are only 2 loops on a row, net those 2 loops together without using a mesh stick. Cut the thread and remove the netting from the foundation loop.



Saturday, May 26, 2018

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 6 x 11 squares - Starting from the Middle


Once I finished the rectangle of square-mesh that was an odd width of squares by an even length of squares (5 x 14), I decided to try one that was an even width of squares by an odd length of squares.

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 6 x 11 squares - Starting from the Middle

Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

I made it with size 20 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.
Start the Rectangle
Row 1: Using the small mesh stick, net 7 more knots into the foundation loop.
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2: Using the large mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in the row)
Row 3: Using the large mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops; net the last 2 loops together. (6 loops in the last row)
Rows 4-7: Continue by repeating Row 3 until there are only 2 loops in the row. (For each additional row, the number of loops will decrease by 1.)   When there are only 2 loops on a row, net those 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread. Remove the netting from the foundation loop (which unties the knots created in Row 1) and undo the former knots in Row 1 to straighten the loops. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of Row 1.
Lengthen the Rectangle
Row 8: (Increase Row) Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop; net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 9: (Decrease Row) Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops in the row)
Rows 10-11: Repeat these 2 rows until the number of squares desired equals the number of squares on the long side of the rectangle.
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in the row)
Finish the Rectangle
Row 13: (Decrease Row) Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops; net the last 2 loops together. (6 loops in the row)
Rows 14-17: Continue by repeating this decrease row until there are only 2 loops in the row. (For each additional row, the number of loops will decrease by 1.)   When there are only 2 loops on a row, net those 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread and remove the netting from the foundation loop.

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 5 x 14 squares - Starting from the Middle


How time flies. I had posts completed up through the end of April. At that point I was to have a week free, or so I thought. That week came and flew by so fast I hardly knew it existed. Then one day, weeks after I should have been creating new posts, I realized I had missed a couple of weeks. So, having proved I'm human and can make mistakes, here I am again.

Almost a year ago I made some rectangles of square-mesh netting, starting from the middle. I made one with an even number of squares in both the width and the length and one with an odd number of squares in the width and length. I wondered what would change in the instructions if I made one with an odd number of squares in the width and an even number of squares in the length.

Then I got busy with my husband trying to figure out square-mesh Vandykes and scallops. Recently I realized that I had not tried that combination so I made a rectangle of square-mesh netting to find out the answer to my question.

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 5 x 14 squares - Starting from the Middle

Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

I made it with size 20 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.
Start the Rectangle
Row 1: Using the small mesh stick, net 6 more knots into the foundation loop.
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2: Using the large mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop. (6 loops in the row)
Row 3: Using the large mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops; net the last 2 loops together. (5 loops in the last row)
Rows 4-6: Repeat Row 3 until there are only 2 loops in the row. (For each additional row, the number of loops will decrease by 1.)   When there are only 2 loops on a row, net those 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread. Remove the netting from the foundation loop (which unties the knots created in Row 1) and undo the former knots in Row 1 to straighten the loops. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of Row 1.
Lengthen the Rectangle
Row 7: (Increase Row) Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop; net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
Row 8: (Decrease Row) Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops in the row)
Rows 9-14: Repeat these 2 rows until the number of rows equals the number of squares desired in the length of the rectangle.
Row 15: Net 1 knot in each loop. (7 loops in the row)
Finish the Rectangle
Row 16: (Decrease Row) Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops; net the last 2 loops together. (5 loops in the row)
Rows 17-19: Continue by repeating this decrease row until there are only 2 loops in the row. (For each additional row, the number of loops will decrease by 1.)   When there are only 2 loops on a row, net those 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread and remove the netting from the foundation loop.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

A Generic pattern for a rectangle of Square Diamond Netting


Finally,  I wanted to see if I could make a generic pattern that allowed for a choice of the width and length. To my surprise, I found that I only needed one pattern.


Square Diamond Netting - Rectangle - 6 x 9 small squares




NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
wrapped long loop
Wrap the yarn once around the mesh stick by putting it across the front of the mesh stick, around the mesh stick, and up the back side of the mesh stick.  Then tie the netting knot in the usual way.

long loop in a long loop
Remove the mesh stick if necessary.  Tie the netting knot so the bottom of the long loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.

long loop in a short loop
Tie the knot at the bottom of the short loop by gradually pulling the thread slightly upwards not downwards when ending the netting knot.

DO NOT have the bottom of the short loop touch the top of the mesh stick.


There are also two ways to create the short loop.

NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
short loop in a short loop
Pull short loop down so the bottom of the short loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.  Tie the netting knot in the regular way.

short loop in a long loop
Tie the netting knot in the regular way.  The bottom of the long loop is touching the mesh stick


Here are my generic instructions for creating a rectangle of Diamond Square Netting.

Before starting the actual netting:

  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.

A Rectangle of Square Diamond Netting – Generic Instructions

The first step is to decide how many small squares are desired along each side of the rectangle.

Abbreviations
WSS (Width Small Squares) = the number of small squares in the width of the rectangle

LSS (Length Small Squares) = the number of small squares in the length of the rectangle

Increase Portion of the Square
Row 1:  Net 2 more knots into the foundation loop. (2 loops - both small in the row)

Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Net a wrapped long loop in the first loop net both a short loop and a wrapped long loop into the last loop. (3 loops - long, short, and long in the row)

Repeating Increase Rows
Odd Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
*Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
net 2 short loops in the last loop and turn the netting.

Even Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Net a wrapped long loop in the first loop,
*net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; *
Repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
Net both a short loop and a wrapped long loop into the last loop.

Repeat the odd and even rows until the desired number of small squares desired appear on the sides of the triangle and the number of the last row is (2 times WSS) minus 1. The last row will be an odd row.

Corner Turning Row: (The loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged.)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop,
net a short loop in the next loop,
*net a wrapped long loop in the following loop, net a short loop in the next loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
net a short loop and a wrapped, long loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (2 times WSS loops in the row)

Lengthening Rows:
           Odd Lengthening Row: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
                                *Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*;
repeat from * to *, end with net a long loop in the last loop,
turn the netting. (2 times WSS loops in the row)

               
Even Lengthening Row: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop and a wrapped long loop in the last loop, in the last loop, turn the netting. (2 times WSS loops in the row)

Repeat these two rows to lengthen the rectangle until the desired # of small squares are on the long side of the rectangle and the number of the last row is (2 times LSS) minus 1. The last row will be an odd row.

Turning the Next Corner (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop and a wrapped long loop in the last loop, in the last loop, turn the netting. ((2 times WSS) minus 1 loops in the row)

Decreasing Portion of the Rectangle (each row will have one fewer loop than the previous row)
Odd Decreasing Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick net, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * across the row, turn the netting.

Even Decreasing Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *repeat from * to * across the row.

Repeat these two decreasing rows until 2 loops remain. The last row will be an odd row.

Final Corner Formed
Last Even Row: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, net a short loop in the next loop.

Last Odd Row: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the short loop. Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Tie the First Corner
Remove the foundation loop from row one of the net. 
Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle. 
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.


Saturday, April 21, 2018

A Rectangle of Square Diamond Netting - 4 by 7 small squares


Now,  I wanted to see if I could make one with the number of small squares with an even width and an odd length. I chose to have 4 small squares in the width and 7 small squares in the length of this rectangle.




NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
wrapped long loop
Wrap the yarn once around the mesh stick by putting it across the front of the mesh stick, around the mesh stick, and up the back side of the mesh stick.  Then tie the netting knot in the usual way.

long loop in a long loop
Remove the mesh stick if necessary.  Tie the netting knot so the bottom of the long loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.

long loop in a short loop
Tie the knot at the bottom of the short loop by gradually pulling the thread slightly upwards not downwards when ending the netting knot.

DO NOT have the bottom of the short loop touch the top of the mesh stick.


There are also two ways to create the short loop.

NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
short loop in a short loop
Pull short loop down so the bottom of the short loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.  Tie the netting knot in the regular way.

short loop in a long loop
Tie the netting knot in the regular way.  The bottom of the long loop is touching the mesh stick


Here are my instructions for creating a rectangle of Diamond Square Netting with a width of 4 small squares, and a length of 7 small squares.

Before starting the actual netting:

  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.
Increase Portion of the Rectangle
Row 1:  Net 2 more knots into the foundation loop. (2 loops - both small in the row)

Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Net a wrapped long loop in the first loop net both a short loop and a wrapped long  loop into the last loop. (3 loops - long, short, and long in the row)

Row 3: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
*Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*; repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net 2 short loops in the last loop and turn the netting. (4 loops in the row)

Row 4: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Net a wrapped long loop in the first loop, *net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; * repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net both a short loop and a wrapped long loop into the last loop. (5 loops in the row)

Row 5: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
*Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*; repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net 2 short loops in the last loop and turn the netting. (6 loops in the row)

Row 6: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Net a wrapped long loop in the first loop, *net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; * repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net both a short loop and a wrapped long loop into the last loop. (7 loops in the row)

Row 7: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
*Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*; repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net 2 short loops in the last loop and turn the netting. (8 loops in the row)


 Turning the Corner:
Row 8: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, net a short loop in the next loop, *net a wrapped long loop in the following loop, net a short loop in the next loop; * repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop and a wrapped, long loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (8 loops in the row)

Lengthening the Rectangle:
                Row 9: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
                        *Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*;
repeat from * to *, ending with net a long loop in the last loop,
turn the netting. (8 loops in the row)

                Row 10: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop and a wrapped long loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (8 loops in the row)

Row 11: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
                        *Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*;
repeat from * to *, ending with net a long loop in the last loop,
turn the netting. (8 loops in the row)

Row 12: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop and a wrapped long loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (8 loops in the row)

Row 13: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
                        *Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*;
repeat from * to *, ending with net a long loop in the last loop,
turn the netting. (8 loops in the row)

Turning the Next Corner

Row 14: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (7 loops in the row)

Decreasing Portion of the Rectangle
Row 15: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * across the row, turn the netting. (7 loops in the row)

Row 16: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *repeat from * to * across the row. (3 loops in the row)

Row 17: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * across the row, turn the netting. (4 loops in the row)

Row 18: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *repeat from * to * across the row. (3 loops in the row)

Row 19: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * across the row, turn the netting. (2 loops in the row)

Final Corner Formed
Row 20: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, net a short loop in the next loop.

Row 21: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the short loop.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Tie the First Corner
Remove the foundation loop from row one of the net. 
Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle. 
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Saturday, April 14, 2018

A Rectangle of Square Diamond Netting - 3 by 6 small squares


Now,  I wanted to see if I could make one with the number of small squares with an odd width and an even length. I chose to have 3 small squares in the width and 6 small squares in the length of this rectangle.




NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
wrapped long loop
Wrap the yarn once around the mesh stick by putting it across the front of the mesh stick, around the mesh stick, and up the back side of the mesh stick.  Then tie the netting knot in the usual way.

long loop in a long loop
Remove the mesh stick if necessary.  Tie the netting knot so the bottom of the long loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.

long loop in a short loop
Tie the knot at the bottom of the short loop by gradually pulling the thread slightly upwards not downwards when ending the netting knot.

DO NOT have the bottom of the short loop touch the top of the mesh stick.


There are also two ways to create the short loop.

NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
short loop in a short loop
Pull short loop down so the bottom of the short loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.  Tie the netting knot in the regular way.

short loop in a long loop
Tie the netting knot in the regular way.  The bottom of the long loop is touching the mesh stick


Here are my instructions for creating a rectangle of Diamond Square Netting with a width of 3 small squares, and a length of 6 small squares.

Before starting the actual netting:

  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.


Increase Portion of the Rectangle

Row 1:  Net 2 more knots into the foundation loop. (2 loops - both small in the row)

Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Net a wrapped long loop in the first loop net both a short loop and a wrapped long loop into the last loop. (3 loops - long, short, and long in the row)

Row 3: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
*Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*; repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net 2 short loops in the last loop and turn the netting. (4 loops in the row)

Row 4: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Net a wrapped long loop in the first loop, *net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; * repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net both a short loop and a wrapped long loop into the last loop. (5 loops in the row)

Row 5: Repeat row 3 until the desired number of small squares desired appear on the sides of the triangle.  (6 loops in the row)

Turning the Corner:
Row 6: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, net a short loop in the next loop,
*net a wrapped long loop in the following loop, net a short loop in the next loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop and a wrapped, long loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (6 loops in the row)

Lengthening the Rectangle:
                Row 7: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
                        *Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*;
repeat from * to *, ending with net a long loop in the last loop,
turn the netting. (6 loops in the row)

                Row 8: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop and a wrapped long loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (6 loops in the row)

Row 9: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
                        *Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*;
repeat from * to *, ending with net a long loop in the last loop,
turn the netting. (6 loops in the row)

Row 10: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop and a wrapped long loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (6 loops in the row)

Row 11: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
                        *Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*;
repeat from * to *, ending with net a long loop in the last loop,
turn the netting. (6 loops in the row)

Turning the Next Corner

Row 12: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left, net a short loop in the last loop, turn the netting. (5 loops in the row)

Decreasing Portion of the Rectangle
Row 13: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * across the row, turn the netting. (4 loops in the row)

Row 14: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a wrapped long loop in the following loop; *repeat from * to * across the row. (3 loops in the row)

Row 15: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * across the row, turn the netting. (2 loops in the row)

Final Corner Formed
Row 16: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, net a short loop in the next loop.

Row 17: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the short loop.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Tie the First Corner
Remove the foundation loop from row one of the net. 
Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle. 
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.