Saturday, August 12, 2017

Single Handle Onion Bag


This week I completed a different type of Onion Bag. It differs from last week's bags in that it does not have a Moebius Handle; it has a plain single handle without the Moebius twist.


Unlike the Onion Bag with a Moebius Handle, this bag has a handle with two edges and two sides - an inside and an outside.


Saturday, August 5, 2017

A variety of Onion Bags


This week I received a challenge. I don't think the person giving the challenge realized that it was a challenge. I was asked if I could make an onion bag that was 20 inches long when it was filled. An onion bag has a hole at the top of the bag and a hole in the side of the bag where you can add or remove onions without reaching all the way to the top.




















My original bag pattern produced a bag that was 23 inches long when it was filled.










































During the week I tried over and over and over again to achieve a bag length of 20 inches.

Some were longer, some were shorter, all were different.







My daughter says she now understands why we have so many string bags around the house.

Sometimes you can't tell how something is going to work until you try it.

These bags all have a Moebius Handle. That means the entire bag is like one big Moebius strip.

I think Moebius bags are fun because the bag has only one edge and only one side, not two. Twist your brain in knots wondering how a surface with only one side can hold anything.

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Top-down spiral net bag with decreases at the bottom


I am gradually going through all my old bag patterns and checking the instructions. This bag starts with the handles. The handles are all joined together to form the mouth of the bag. The body of the bag is formed with spiral netting. The bottom of the bag is formed with 4 decrease rows.

Now if I can just get the instructions updated in my computer.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Square-mesh netting and the darning stitch - pattern three


Using some net embroidery patterns from pages 94-95 in The Techniques of Filet Lace by Pauline Knight, I designed three bookmarks that used the darning stitch.

The bookmarks can be made with any mesh stick. The size of the bookmark will vary depending on which mesh stick is used.



Here is the third example I made.



Square Mesh Instructions

Begin the Bookmark by Increasing
Row 1:  Leaving an 8" tail, net 2 knots into the foundation loop.  (2 loops)
Row 2:  Net into the first loop and increase by netting twice into the second loop.  (3 loops)
Row 3:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.  (4 loops)
Row 4:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (5 loops)
Row 5:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (6 loops)
Row 6:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (7 loops)
Row 7:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (8 loops)
Row 8:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (9 loops)
Row 9:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (10 loops)
Row 10:  Net 1 knot in each loop.   (10 loops)
Row 11:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (11 loops)

Turn One Corner
Row 12:  Net 1 knot in each loop until there are 2 loops left.  Net the last 2 loops together. (10 loops)

Lengthen Bookmark by Increasing and Decreasing
Row 13:  Net 1 knot in each loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (11 loops)
Row 14:  Net 1 knot in each loop until there are 2 loops left; net the last 2 loops together. (10 loops)
Rows 15 - 26:  Alternate between instructions for row 13 and for row 14.

Turn a Corner and Complete the Bookmark by Decreasing
Rows 27-33:  Net 1 knot in each loop until there are 2 loops left; net the last 2 loops together.

Create Last Corner
Row 34:   Net the last 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.  Cut the thread.  Fasten loose end of thread into the net bookmark, or cut it leaving a small tail.

Complete the First Corner of the Bookmark
1.       Remove the beginning of the netting from the foundation loop and, with the 6"-8" tail. 
2.       Two loops will be visible. Net the first two loops of the bookmark together without using a mesh stick.

3.       Fasten loose ends of the thread in the same manner you did for Row 32.


Saturday, July 15, 2017

Square-mesh netting and the darning stitch - pattern two


Using some patterns from pages 94-95 in The Techniques of Filet Lace by Pauline Knight, I designed three bookmarks that used the darning stitch.

The bookmarks can be made with any mesh stick. The size of the bookmark will vary depending on which mesh stick is used.



Here is the second of the examples I made.



Square Mesh Instructions

Begin the Bookmark by Increasing
Row 1:  Leaving an 8" tail, net 2 knots into the foundation loop.  (2 loops)
Row 2:  Net into the first loop and increase by netting twice into the second loop.  (3 loops)
Row 3:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.  (4 loops)
Row 4:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (5 loops)
Row 5:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (6 loops)
Row 6:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (7 loops)
Row 7:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (8 loops)
Row 8:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (9 loops)
Row 9:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (10 loops)

Turn One Corner
Row 10:  Net 1 knot in each loop until there are 2 loops left.  Net the last 2 loops together. (9 loops)

Lengthen Bookmark by Increasing and Decreasing
Row 11:  Net 1 knot in each loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (10 loops)
Row 12:  Net 1 knot in each loop until there are 2 loops left.  Net the last 2 loops together. (9 loops)
Rows 13 - 38:  Alternate between instructions for row 11 and for row 12.

Turn a Corner and Complete the Bookmark by Decreasing
Row 39:  Net 1 knot in each loop until you come to the last 2 loops; net the last 2 loops together.  Row 40-45: Repeat the last row until there are just 2 loops left.

Create Last Corner
Row 46:   Net the last 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.  Cut the thread.  Fasten loose end of thread into the net bookmark, or cut it leaving a small tail.

Complete the First Corner of the Bookmark
1.       Remove the beginning of the netting from the foundation loop and, with the 6"-8" tail. 
2.       Two loops will be visible. Net the first two loops of the bookmark together without using a mesh stick.
3.       Fasten loose ends of the thread in the same manner you did for Row 46.



Saturday, July 8, 2017

Square-mesh netting and the darning stitch - pattern one


Earlier this year I was asked to teach our local lace group something about square-mesh netting. I decided to also teach them how to do a simple lacis or net embroidery stitch. I checked a few lacis or filet lace books, got some ideas, and designed three different square-mesh bookmark patterns that used the darning stitch - one of the easier net embroidery stitches. I used some patterns from The Techniques of Filet Lace by Pauline Knight found on pages 94 and 95 to design some bookmarks.

The bookmarks can be made with any mesh stick. The size of the bookmark will vary depending on which mesh stick is used.

Here is one of the examples I made.



Square Mesh Instructions

Begin the Bookmark by Increasing
Row 1:  Leaving an 8" tail, net 2 knots into the foundation loop.  (2 loops)
Row 2:  Net into the first loop and increase by netting twice into the second loop.  (3 loops)
Row 3:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.  (4 loops)
Row 4:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (5 loops)
Row 5:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (6 loops)
Row 6:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (7 loops)
Row 7:  Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last loop, net 2 knots into that loop.   (8 loops)

Turn One Corner
Row 8:  Net 1 knot in each loop until there are 2 loops left.  Net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops)

Lengthen Bookmark by Increasing and Decreasing
Row 9:  Net 1 knot in each loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops)
Row 10:  Net 1 knot in each loop until there are 2 loops left.  Net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops)
Rows 11 - 26:  Alternate between instructions for row 9 and for row 10.

Turn a Corner and Complete the Bookmark by Decreasing
Row 27: Net 1 knot in each loop.
Rows 28-32:  Net 1 knot in each loop until there are 2 loops left.  Net the last 2 loops together.

Create Last Corner
Row 33:   Net the last 2 loops together without using a mesh stick.  Cut the thread.  Fasten loose end of thread into the net bookmark, or cut it leaving a small tail.

Complete the First Corner of the Bookmark
1.       Remove the beginning of the netting from the foundation loop and, with the 6"-8" tail. 
2.       Two loops will be visible. Net the first two loops of the bookmark together without using a mesh stick.
3.       Fasten loose ends of the thread in the same manner you did for Row 33.


Saturday, July 1, 2017

A Square Frame of Square-mesh Netting - Outer Edge is 11 by 11 squares; Inner Edge is 5 by 5 squares


The final pattern I was looking for was a frame of square-mesh netting. A square frame was shown in the Encyclopedia of Needlework by Therese De Dillmont. The size of the square and the opening in the center depends on the thread and mesh sticks used. The thicker the thread or larger the mesh stick is, the larger the square will be for the same number of square-meshes.  Lacis or net embroidery can be added to decorate the frame.




Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.
Increase Portion of the Square
Row 1:  Net 2 more knots into the foundation loop.  (2 loops in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2:  Net 1 knot in the first loop; increase by netting two knots in the 2nd loop. (3 loops in the row)
Row 3: Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row)
Rows 4-7:  Net one knot in each loop except the last loop; net 2 knots in that last loop. (5 loops in the row)

Forming the top of the square
Row 8 (part 1): Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops. (4 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, increase by netting 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row) The increase is on the outer edge.
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop, except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (4 loops in the row) The decrease is on the inner edge.
  
Turn Corner and Start Side
Row 11: Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, increase by netting 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together, net 1 more knot in those two loops. (5 loops in the row)
Row 13: Net 1 knot in each loop, except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (4 loops in the row) The decrease is now on the outer edge.
Row 14: Net 1 knot in each loop, except the last loop, increase by netting 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row) The increase is now on the inner edge.
Row 15: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (4 loops in the row) The decrease is on the outer edge.
Row 16 (part 1): Net 1 knot in each loop, except for the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row) The increase is now on the inner edge.
Cut the thread on the inside edge.

Start the Second Half of the Square
Tie the thread from the shuttle onto the bottom of the first loop of row 7.
Row 8 (part 2 - Finish netting the rest of row 8): Net 1 knot in each loop for 4 loops. (4 loops in the row)
Row 9: Net 1 knot in the first loop; increase by netting 2 knots in the last loop. (5 loops in the row) The increase is on the outer edge.
Row 10: Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (4 loops in the row) The decrease is on the inner edge.

Turn Corner and Start Side
Row 11: Net 1 knot in the first loop; increase by netting two knots in the 2nd loop. (5 loops in the row)
Row 12: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together, net 1 more knot in those two loops. (5 loops in the row)
Row 13: Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row) The decrease is now on the outer edge.
Row 14: Net 1 knot in the first loop; increase by netting two knots in the 2nd loop. (5 loops in the row) The increase is now on the inner edge.
Row 15: Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together, net 1 more knot in those two loops. (5 loops in the row)
Row 16 (part 2): Net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net 2 knots in the last loop. (4 loops in the row) The decrease is now on the outer edge.
Cut the thread on the inside edge.

Join Partial Rows and Decrease
Tie the thread from the shuttle to the bottom of the first loop formed in row 16.
Row 17: Net together the first and second loops of Row 16, net 1 knot in each loop for 2 loops, net the two closed loops together, joining both parts of row 16, net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together (7 loops in the row)
Row 18: Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together.
Repeat row 18 until there are two loops left.      

Tie the Last Corner         
Finish the final row by netting these two loops together, but without a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Tie the First Corner
Remove the foundation loop from row one of the net. 
Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle. 
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Saturday, June 24, 2017

A Rectangle of Square Diamond Netting


After finally figuring out how to make a square of Square Diamond Netting, I wanted to make a rectangle of Square Diamond Netting.



The same instructions about making the long and short loops I gave last week still pertain. I've listed again the three ways to create the long loop.


NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
wrapped long loop
Wrap the yarn once around the mesh stick by putting it across the front of the mesh stick, around the mesh stick, and up the back side of the mesh stick.  Then tie the netting knot in the usual way.

long loop in a long loop
Remove the mesh stick if necessary.  Tie the netting knot so the bottom of the long loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.

long loop in a short loop
Tie the knot at the bottom of the short loop by gradually pulling the thread slightly upwards not downwards when ending the netting knot.

DO NOT have the bottom of the short loop touch the top of the mesh stick.


I've also included the two ways to create the short loop.

NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
short loop in a short loop
Pull short loop down so the bottom of the short loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.  Tie the netting knot in the regular way.

short loop in a long loop
Tie the netting knot in the regular way.  The bottom of the long loop is touching the mesh stick

  
Here are my instructions for creating a rectangle of Diamond Square Netting.

Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.
Increase Portion of the Square
Row 1:  Net 2 more knots into the foundation loop. (2 loops both small in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2:  Net a long-wrapped loop in the first loop net both a short loop and a long-wrapped loop into the last loop. (3 loops, long, short, and long in the row)

Repeating Increase Rows
Odd Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
*Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
net 2 short loops in the last loop and turn the netting.
Even Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Net a long-wrapped loop in the first loop,
*net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; *
Repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
Net both a short loop and a long, wrapped loop into the last loop.

Repeat the odd and even rows until the number of small squares desired appear on the sides of the triangle. The last row will be an odd row.


Corner Turning Row:
Net a short loop in the first loop,
*Net a long-wrapped loop in the next loop, net a short loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
net a short loop in the last loop, turn the netting.

Lengthening Rows:
                Odd Increase Row: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
                                Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the small loop,
*net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop*;
repeat from * to *, end with net 2 short loops in the last loop,
turn the netting.

                Even Decrease Row: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Net a long-wrapped loop in the first loop,
*Net a short loop in the next loop, net a long-wrapped loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
net a short loop in the last loop, turn the netting.

Repeat these two rows to lengthen the rectangle until the desired # of small squares are on the long side of the rectangle, ending with an increase row.

Decreasing Rows
Even Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long-wrapped loop in the following loop; *repeat from * to * across the row.
Odd Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick net, 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long loop in the following loop; * repeat from * to * across the row, turn the netting.
Repeat these two decreasing rows until 2 loops remain.

Final Odd and Even Rows
Last Even Row: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, net a short loop in the next loop.
Last Odd Row: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the short loop. Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Tie the First Corner
Remove the foundation loop from row one of the net. 
Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle. 
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

A Square of Square Diamond Netting


One of the patterns I was looking for several months ago was one with big squares and little squares.
It is called Square Diamond Netting.


This pattern is very confusing. None of the directions I looked at were clear.  One of the sources quoted in The Art of Netting, edited by Jules and Kaethe Kliot gave only the following instructions:
"In making a foundation of this style, the work is begun in the usual manner. For the small squares the thread is wrapped once about the mesh-stick; for the large squares it is wrapped twice. This makes a pretty foundation for darning fancy patterns upon."
I finally resorted to looking very closely at the few drawings of the stitch that I could find. From that, and subsequent practice, I learned that there are two lengths of loops tied in this type of stitch – a long loop and a short loop. I found, however, that there are three ways to create the long loop.


NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
wrapped long loop
Wrap the yarn once around the mesh stick by putting it across the front of the mesh stick, around the mesh stick, and up the back side of the mesh stick.  Then tie the netting knot in the usual way.

long loop in a long loop
Remove the mesh stick if necessary.  Tie the netting knot so the bottom of the long loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.

long loop in a short loop
Tie the knot at the bottom of the short loop by gradually pulling the thread slightly upwards not downwards when ending the netting knot.

DO NOT have the bottom of the short loop touch the top of the mesh stick.


There are also two ways to create the short loop.

NAME
INSTRUCTIONS
short loop in a short loop
Pull short loop down so the bottom of the short loop is touching the top of the mesh stick.  Tie the netting knot in the regular way.

short loop in a long loop
Tie the netting knot in the regular way.  The bottom of the long loop is touching the mesh stick




Here are my instructions for creating a square of Diamond Square Netting.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.
Increase Portion of the Square
Row 1:  Net 2 more knots into the foundation loop. (2 loops both small in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2:  Net a long-wrapped loop in the first loop net both a short loop and a long-wrapped loop into the last loop. (3 loops, long, short, and long in the row)

Repeating Increase Rows
Odd Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
*Net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
net 2 short loops in the last loop and turn the netting.
Even Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Net a long-wrapped loop in the first loop,
*net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; *
Repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
Net both a short loop and a long, wrapped loop into the last loop.

Repeat the odd and even rows until the number of small squares desired appear on the sides of the triangle. The last row will be an even row.


Decrease Portion of the Square
                First Odd Decrease Row:
                        Net a short loop in the next loop,
                        *net 1 long-wrapped loop in the following loop, net a short loop in the next loop*; repeat from * to * across the row.

                First Even Decrease Row:
Net a short loop in the first loop,
*Net a long-wrapped loop in the next loop, net a short loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * until there is one loop left,
net a short loop in the last loop, turn the netting.

Repeating Decrease Rows
Odd Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are even with each other)
Without a mesh stick net 1 knot in the short loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the long loop, net a long loop in the short loop; *
repeat from * to * across the row, turn the netting.
Even Rows: (the loops at the bottom of the finished row are jagged)
Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, *net a short loop in the next loop, net a long-wrapped loop in the following loop; *
repeat from * to * across the row.
Final Odd and Even Rows
Last Even Row: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop, now with a mesh stick, net a short loop in the next loop.
Last Odd Row: Without a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the short loop. Cut the thread near the knot just tied.

Tie the First Corner
Remove the foundation loop from row one of the net. 
Tie the tail onto a tapestry needle, which is used in place of the netting needle. 
Net the first two loops together without using a mesh stick.
Cut the thread near the knot just tied.


Saturday, June 10, 2017

Rectangle of Square Mesh - 6 x 14 squares - Loops on the Sides and Bottom - Starting from the Middle


I was able to figure out how to put loops on the sides and bottom of the rectangle.


Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

I made it with size 5 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.

Start the Rectangle:
Row 1:  Using the smaller mesh stick, net 7 more knots into the foundation loop.

  • Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop.
Row 3:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop except the last loop, net the last two loops together.
Row 4:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting.

Continue by repeating rows 3 and 4. Each row will have one less loop than the previous row.

When there is only 1 loop on a row, cut the thread, remove the netting from the foundation loop, and remove the knots from the top of the loops in row one. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of row one.

Lengthen the Rectangle:
1. Net 1 knot into each loop except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
2. Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting. (7 loops in the row)

Repeat these 2 rows until the number of squares desired equals the number of squares in the long side of the rectangle, ending with row 2.

Finish the Rectangle:
Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting.

Repeat this row until there are only 2 loops on a row, without using a mesh stick, net 1 knot in the first loop and skip the second loop.

Cut the thread and remove the netting from the foundation loop.



Saturday, June 3, 2017

Rectangle of Square Mesh - 5 x 11 squares - Loops on the Bottom - Starting from the Middle


I could not figure out how to put loops on all four sides of a rectangle of square-mesh netting, but I did figure out how to put it on one side - the bottom.


Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

I made it with size 5 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.
Start the Rectangle:
Row 1:  Using the smaller mesh stick, net 6 more knots into the foundation loop.

  • Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop.
Row 3:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop except the last loop, net the last two loops together.

Continue by repeating rows 3. Each row will have one less loop than the previous row.

When there is only 1 loop on a row, cut the thread, remove the netting from the foundation loop, and remove the knots from the top of the loops in row one. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of row one.

Lengthen the Rectangle:
1. Net 1 knot into each loop except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
2. Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting. (6 loops in the row)

Repeat these 2 rows until the number of squares desired equals the number of squares in the long side of the rectangle, ending with row 2.

Finish the Rectangle:
1. Net 1 knot into each loop except the last loop, net the last two loops together.
2. Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting.

Repeat this row until there are only 2 loops on a row, net 1 knot in the first loop, now, without using a mesh stick, net into both the first loop again and into the second loop, netting them together.

Cut the thread and remove the netting from the foundation loop.



Saturday, May 27, 2017

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 6 x 12 squares - Starting from the Middle


I wondered if there would be a difference if I used an even number of squares. So I tried it.



Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

I made it with size 5 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.
Start the Rectangle:
Row 1:  Using the smaller mesh stick, net 7 more knots into the foundation loop.  
  • Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop. 
Row 3:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. 

Continue by repeating row three. Each row will have one less loop than the previous row.  When there are only 2 loop on a row, net those two loops together without using a mesh stick. 

Cut the thread, remove the netting from the foundation loop, and remove the knots from the top of the loops in row one. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of row one.

Lengthen the Rectangle:
1. Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (8 loops in the row)
2. Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (7 loops in the row)

Repeat these 2 rows until the number of squares desired equals the number of squares on the long side of the rectangle.

Finish the Rectangle:
Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. 

Continue by repeating this decrease row. Each row will have one less loop than the previous row. 

When there are only 2 loop on a row, net those two loops together without using a mesh stick. 

Cut the thread and remove the netting from the foundation loop.

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Rectangle of Square-Mesh – 5 x 13 squares - Starting from the Middle


Once I made the squares, I wondered if I could make a rectangle of square-mesh netting starting from the middle.


Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

I made it with size 5 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.

Start the Rectangle
Row 1:  Using the smaller mesh stick, net 6 more knots into the foundation loop.

  • Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop.
Row 3:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together.

Continue by repeating row three. Each row will have one less loop than the previous row.  When there are only 2 loop on a row, net those two loops together without using a mesh stick.

Cut the thread, remove the netting from the foundation loop, and remove the knots from the top of the loops in row one. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of row one.

Lengthen the Rectangle
1. Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (7 loops in the row)
2. Net 1 knot in each loop except for the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (8 loops in the row)

Repeat these 2 rows until the number of squares desired equals the number of squares on the long side of the rectangle.

Finish the Rectangle:
Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together.

Continue by repeating this decrease row. Each row will have one less loop than the previous row.

When there are only 2 loop on a row, net those two loops together without using a mesh stick.

Cut the thread and remove the netting from the foundation loop.

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Square of Square-Mesh with Looped Edges – 9 x 9 squares - Starting from the Middle


I must be a slow learner or unobservant, because I did the same mistake with this square that started in the middle as I did with the first one.



Once I realized the problem, I made the same correction and the problem went away. When I remade this sample, I made it with size 5 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.



Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

Before starting the actual netting:

  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.


Square of Square-Mesh with Looped Edges – 9 x 9 squares

Start the Square:
Row 1:  Using the smaller mesh stick, net 10 more knots into the foundation loop.

  • Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop.
Row 3:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting.

Continue by repeating row three. Each row will have one less loop than the previous row.
When there is only 1 loop on a row, cut the thread, remove the netting from the foundation loop, and remove the knots from the top of the loops in row one. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of row one.

Finish the Square:
Next row: Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop.

Decrease Row: Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting.

Continue by repeating the Decrease Row. Each row will have one loop less than the previous row.
When there is only 1 loop on a row, cut the thread.

Saturday, May 6, 2017

A 9 by 9 Square of Square-Mesh Netting - Starting from the Middle


I was intrigued by the concept of starting in the middle of a square of square-mesh netting and achieving a square.  The first time I made it, I used the same size mesh stick all the way through. That created a noticeable, wide zig-zag row through the middle of the square. That row is bigger because the loops formed in the first row also include the knots that fasten it to the foundation loop. When the foundation loop is removed, the loops expand as the knots is untied.



To solve the problem, I used two mesh sticks, one slightly smaller than the other. The smaller mesh stick or knitting needle will be used for the first row only. (The larger the cord or thread, the greater the difference needs to be.)

When I remade this sample, I made it with size 5 crochet thread, and used a #8 and a #6 knitting needle.


Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.


Before starting the actual netting:

  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord.
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop.
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.



Square with Selvage Edges – 9 x 9 squares  

Start the Square:
Row 1:  Using the smaller mesh stick, net 10 more knots into the foundation loop.

  • Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot into each loop.
Row 3:  Using the larger mesh stick, net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net those last 2 loops together.

Continue by repeating row three. Each row will have one less loop than the previous row.  When there are only 2 loop on a row, net those two loops together without using a mesh stick.

Cut the thread, remove the netting from the foundation loop, and remove the knots from the top of the loops in row one. Run the foundation-loop cord through one of the other rows of netting. Tie the thread from the netting needle to the loose thread at the end of row one.

To finish the square:

Repeat Row 3.
Continue by repeating row 3. Each row will have one loop less than the previous row.
When there are only 2 loop on a row, net those two loops together without using a mesh stick.

Saturday, April 29, 2017

Square-mesh netting in strips - with loops


One of the other square-mesh patterns included in the Encyclopedia of Needlework by Therese De Dillmont was a strip of netting with loops along the bottom instead of the usual selvage.



Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

A Strip of Square-Mesh Netting – Selvage on the Top and Loops on the Bottom – 7 Squares High

Before starting the actual netting:

  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord. 
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.  
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.  
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop. 
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.


Start the strip of square-mesh netting:

Row 1:  Net 8 more knots into the foundation loop.  (8 loops in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2:  Net 1 knot into each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 3:  Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting and start the next row. (8 loops in the row)

Repeat rows 2 and 3 until the piece is as long as desired. Lacis or net embroidery can be added onto the squares.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Square-Mesh Netting - in strips


Several months ago I was almost ready to proof-read and self-publish a book on square-mesh netting. I just needed to finish working with my husband on the patterns for square-mesh scallops. I also wanted to find two more patterns and figure out how to make them. One was a frame of square-mesh netting with an empty space in the middle. The other was square-mesh netting with big and little squares. Eventually I located them in the Encyclopedia of Needlework by Therese De Dillmont.

To my surprise, I also found instructions and photos for how to make strips of square-mesh netting, how to make square mesh netting starting in the center of the square and working to the corners instead of starting at one corner and working to the diagonal corner, and how to put loops on the edges of the netting. These techniques should be included in any book devoted to making square mesh netting. I began making them and found myself expanding the squares into rectangles.

The strip of square-mesh netting caught my eye and I thought it looked easy enough.


Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

A Strip of Square-Mesh Netting – Selvage Edges on the Top and Bottom – 7 Squares High

Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord. 
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.  
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.  
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop. 
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.

Start the strip of square-mesh netting:

Row 1:  Net 8 more knots into the foundation loop.  (8 loops in the row)

  • Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Net 1 knot into each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 3:  Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (8 loops in the row)

Repeat rows 2 and 3 until the piece is as long as desired. Lacis or net embroidery can be added onto the squares.


Saturday, April 15, 2017

Lantern Stitch Rectangular Shawl


This rectangular shawl turned out to be much wider than I expected. The rows went across the long portion of the shawl. I made sure to have plenty of stitches, since I thought the stitch would stretch down. It did not. Instead it stretched across the row.



Here is the shawl as seen from the back.




This is a closeup of the Lantern Decorative Stitch.

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Hula Stitch Net Shawl - fan


This shawl went a bit fuller than I expected. Some day I'll try one without quite so many stitches. The Hula Increase Stitch increases the number of loops while also pulling some stitches close together.



This is the shawl laid out flat.




Here is the front of the shawl.




 Here is the back of the shawl.




This is a close-up of the neck edge and the first three increases sections.




Here is a close-up of the bottom edge. This edge is a variation of the Spider Decorative Stitch.